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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby Madman Munt on Wed Aug 30, 2017 3:23 pm

Madman Munt wrote: I have a pair of the new Vittoria Corsa G+ 28c ready to go when my rear finally gives out.


I just put these on today. SO nice!

Upgrade your tires and upgrade your life, people.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby bishopdante on Mon Sep 04, 2017 5:21 am

Madman Munt wrote:I think I once had a bike with rotten Oury grips. Nasty. Cut that shit off and get some lock-ons on!

Image
(Not my pic)


The hope lock-on grips are great when new, but go horribly sticky *fast*, and are falling off the bike after a few seasons.

Very few synthetic rubber grips seem to be immune to this ozone-rotting stickification disease, although some are better than others, but they all go the same way in the end.

The big problem with polyurethane is that UV light and the ozone created by it causes the material to break down into the sticky zone, then dust a few years later.

The foam grips are a different material, usually EVA. This lasts a bit longer but turns to dust not glue.

Many sorts of grip tape are also polyurethane based, and will break down in similar ways, either turning to glue or turning to dust.

If you want grips that will last for decades, you can get cork or leather. Both of these are available in a lock-on format, eg:

Brooks leather lock on.
http://www.scotbycycles.co.uk/801/produ ... MoQAvD_BwE

Corbi Cork lock on grips:
https://www.velovitality.co.uk/products ... k-on-grips

Spoked lock on cork grips:
http://www.bicyclecapetown.org/2014/07/ ... ork-grips/

______

They are twice the price or more of plastic grips, but they last more than twice as long.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby dontfeartheringo on Mon Sep 25, 2017 11:00 am

Any of you nerds on Strava?

Get at me.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby dontfeartheringo on Thu Sep 28, 2017 3:32 pm

tmidgett wrote:John Bonham has no competition. Literally none.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby benadrian on Thu Sep 28, 2017 3:45 pm

dontfeartheringo wrote:Any of you nerds on Strava?

Get at me.


Hell yeah. I've been all sorts of bike-y for the last few months. I mean, I've been on bikes my whole life, but it's been for commuting, BMX, or just casual fun. I've been getting into more serious road riding as of late. It's been pretty intense. It's been making me think "why?" quite a bit.

It's an athletic activity that I can do without being in direct competition with other people. I'm not competitive, other than against myself. I can do a group ride and enjoy the activity with other humans, but I don't have to defeat or be defeated by anyone else. It also feels good to get some serious exercise, but also not hate the process of exercising.

I'm kinda burnt on music right now. The bike thing is a total mid life crisis. I sold a couple guitars that I never played and bought a nice carbon bike. I bought a nice bike computer. I'm loving getting up early and going to bed earlier. Meanwhile, I'm working around guitar gear every day, so I rarely do anything gear oriented for fun. I'm finding that there are fewer and fewer shows that I really want to attend. I love playing guitar, but I play with the gear I have. Music has taken a little bit smaller place in my life and I'm perfectly content at the moment.

I feel like my identity is changing, and that used to freak me out. Now I just do what I'm compelled to do and I'm not worrying about it. I feel great!
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby Madman Munt on Thu Sep 28, 2017 4:29 pm

benadrian wrote: I've been getting into more serious road riding as of late. It's been pretty intense.


I realise this probably applies to any activity, but it was a good learning experience for me to find out a few years ago that the seriouser I took my riding the funnerer it got.

Not sure if I'll ever be on Strava, tho. And as someone who just snapped their bike's carbon fork in an incident so stupid I'd be embarrassed to give the details on a Premier Rock Forum, I don't think I'll be getting a carbon bike any time soon.

I remember when you'd see pile-ups in the TdF and all the bikes would snap like breadsticks. It doesn't seem to happen any more so I imagine that (at least at the high-end) the tech is much improved, but Christ, I did not like the crunching sound that 2009 vintage fork made as I went over the bars, and how easily it gave up.

My Bicycle/Bicycling Advice of the day is:

a) make sure you always have a backup bike
b) make sure that your backup bike is kept in rideable condition

(I have not followed this advice for most of my life, and have often been caught out bikeless)
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby sparky on Sat Sep 30, 2017 12:26 am

^Excellent advice that I am failing to follow.

DFTR, I am the stranger who has just joined your Strava club. Not sure I'm going to have much to add on there over the next six months, as I'm working in cyclist-unfriendly Gurgaon for six months, but hopefully I will find a nice route somewhere up in the hills to show everyone how slow I am.

Has anyone here ever had a frame built for them? My own midlife crisis is tempting towards a frame made by Cherubim from Tokyo. I saw one of their bikes in a shop years ago and fell in love with the machine before I even read how great they are. Anyway, bike-fitting/measuring, any tips for a sluggish man?
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby Madman Munt on Sat Sep 30, 2017 3:55 am

sparky wrote:Has anyone here ever had a frame built for them? My own midlife crisis is tempting towards a frame made by Cherubim from Tokyo. I saw one of their bikes in a shop years ago and fell in love with the machine before I even read how great they are. Anyway, bike-fitting/measuring, any tips for a sluggish man?


I have thought about it for years. Can't justify it. It's the standard problem with getting something custom made: apart from the cost, do I even know exactly what I want now, let alone in 10+ years? And if I did, is that significantly different from what I can get off-the-peg?

If I was a weird size/shape it might be a different story.

Those Cherubim bikes look nice! Lots of good frame builders in the UK as well.

I'd get fitted by the best bike fitter I could find before ordering an expensive custom frame.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby sparky on Sat Sep 30, 2017 4:40 am

Madman Munt wrote:I have thought about it for years. Can't justify it. It's the standard problem with getting something custom made: apart from the cost, do I even know exactly what I want now, let alone in 10+ years? And if I did, is that significantly different from what I can get off-the-peg?


You are almost certainly right, and from fiddling about with saddle position and stem length I've come to realise I've come to realise I can make a normal frame fit me well. Cherubim frames are extremely pretty and an unjustifiable luxury outside of this over-ripened dilettante deluding myself that the stylish frame will make me catch up with my stronger friends.

I'll probably go through with it, and hang it on my wall like a Blues Lawyer guitar. I'll follow your advice on calling on a decent bike fitter.

Now, those Vittoria Corsa G+, how puncture-prone do you find them? I have a habit of riding my bikes of surfaces popular with people who smash bottles, London river towpaths, and the occasional scrappy track where I really shouldn't be taking a road bike. Mind, if I do go for the luxury bike, I'd probably keep to beautiful tarmac on it.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby Madman Munt on Sat Sep 30, 2017 5:48 am

I am not someone who normally gets punctures (my wear-and-tear thing is grinding cassettes to dust) so I'm the wrong person to ask. I haven't had them on long so I should ideally give a report after 1000 miles. As it is, I have had one flat since putting them on, but that turned out to be a bad patching job on an inner tube- so nothing at all to do with the tire. I get the impression the rubber is a little bit tougher (fewer small cuts- none to speak of, really) than that of the older Corsa and Open Paves I have used. They are so nice to ride on!

I try to avoid broken glass, and if I do plough through some by mistake I'll check over the tires afterwards to make sure there are no shards that could work their way in. Don't have a single problem with rougher roads. I wouldn't want to ride them through deep mud or sand.

Just in! Vittoria are now doing a beefed-up version, with a thicker rubber and wider tread:

Image

Might be worth a look! Van Avermaet won Paris–Roubaix 2017 on a version (tubular, no doubt) of them. Dunno if they are in the shops yet.

Also, the Panaracer Gravelking could be a good, cheaper, option:

Image

There is not one piece of equipment that has come close to improving my riding experience as great tires.

On pretty bikes: I'd love a Wilier Superleggera, but if I had one it would end up caked in horse shit, chipped from stones, scraped from locking it up, and eventually vandalised/stolen.

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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby total_douche on Sat Sep 30, 2017 10:59 am

A bicycle is considered a vehicle and is regulated by most of the same laws as a car. That means that stop signs and other signals apply to you, too. That's really the big one. Don't be an asshole. It'll get you killed and some hapless driver who had the right-of-way will have to put up with the ire of a million ignorant cyclists because one of them ran a stop sign.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby bishopdante on Sat Sep 30, 2017 12:04 pm

With anything bespoke / made to measure, such as shoes or a suit, a perfect fit can be achieved, and a perfect fit is pretty rare from off-the-shelf items.

Considering the cost of a bike is negligible, and your life is irreplaceable, I would not advise being any kind of a cheapskate about what you ride.

In the era of rapid manufacturing and 3d scanning / motion capture / various adjustable measurement jigs, it's possible to do new sorts of bespoke manufacturing, and this is exciting.

One size fits all tends to fit nobody.

_________

Seems strange that cranks are only available in a few lengths from most manufacturers (175mm), and taller riders may benefit from crank arms that are anything up to 220mm long (assuming that the bottom bracket is positioned correctly), and smaller riders might benefit from shorter cranks.

Very few companies seem to make custom length crank arms, but here's one: http://zinncycles.com/Zinn/custom-cranks/
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby sparky on Sun Oct 01, 2017 4:02 am

M. Munt, if I go ahead with the build (and I think I will), I'm going to read up on those Vittorias. Those Wilier's are divine. I've been passed by a fair few of their copper-coloured ancestors over l'Eroica. My first new bike as a grown-up was an entry-level aluminium Wilier and I am a little sad I passed it on, as it was a sweet and fast bike to ride.

B. Dante, I am happy that the crank-man is the Zinn of the ace maintenance books. That site (as well as the book I've got) has a lot of useful information how what to measure, how to measure it, ratios between this body part and that bike bit. Generous, so generous I'll forgive him for the typo that had me trying to loosen a pedal in the wrong direction until I started crying with frustration, big fat man tears of humiliation.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby benadrian on Wed Oct 18, 2017 1:20 pm

I did a big bike ride this past weekend. I wrote about it on another forum, but thought I'd share here.

For the data-curious, here are a couple links:

https://www.strava.com/activities/1232217720
https://ridewithgps.com/trips/18438039

I was pretty nervous. I got gas down the street about a half mile from home, and I had to rush back home to poop. Normal nerves shit for me. But I gave myself plenty of time, and we showed up and the Camarillo airport hangar a half hour before my start time. I checked out the sponsors, filled my jersey pockets with free Clif shit, hit the can, set up my computer, and left with the whole group at 8:30. It was so nice having Claudia there. I told her she didn't have to come, but she seemed to want to see me ride my first big ride.

The first six miles were pretty easy. It was dusty, kind of windy farmland, but being in a peloton really helped, and we mainly had a tailwind. i did get a good amount of dirt in my mouth and some in my eyes, but hey, I'm expecting the outdoors to want to kill me. At seven miles in I got kicked in the dick with the first climb, which was about three miles. There's about a half mile of steeper climb with a 10% grade, then about two miles of 3-5% grade, finishing with a half mile or so of intense climb with sections of over 15% grade. It sucked. I went into unsustainable heart rates and had to stop a couple times to get back into my body's limits.

I had about two and a half miles of slight downhill and flats to recover. I gobbled some energy cubes. I looked at the houses of rich people. Then I hit a two mile climb with an average of 6% and max grades of 10%. Once again I had to pull off to take a short breather. The air was super dry and all my sweat was evaporating instantly. I could tell that I needed water even though I had no signs of having sweat too much. I was rewarded with a beautiful cruise through an area called Hidden Valley. That cruise ended at the first aid station about 21 miles in. I refilled my water bottles, ate a cookie and a half, and refilled my pockets with free cliff stuff... and a banana. Shit was about to get real.

After the aid station was a two mile climb with an average grade 8.1% and peak grades of 16.2%. The temperature was just about 90 degrees at this point. I tried to stay in my manageable heart rate zone, but I soon ended up in my 34/34 gear ratio and still hitting my max heart rates. In fact, if you look at the ridewithgps data, you can see me hit 178 bpm at mile 22.7, and then jump down to 134. I was standing under a tree trying not to drink all my water.

When that climb finished I felt both terrible and pretty amazing. I was rewarded with a 10 mile descent to PCH, and it was a blast. Well, it was a blast until about five miles in when I hit a pothole that I never saw while going 25-30 mph. My rim bottomed out and before I knew it my tire was getting really wobbly. Pinch flat. I pulled over under a tree, flipped my bike, and started changing my tube. All was well until I realized that I was surrounded by a hand full of bees. I was wearing high-visibility yellow, and the motherfucking bees were trying to pollinate me. I wasn't scared, but it annoyed the crap out of me because I couldn't move fast. I got my tube in and then my travel pump kept coming off of my valve stem. I got enough air in where I felt like I wasn't risking a wipeout. I got back on the bike and a few hundred feet later, just before a corner, I realized that I'd not closed my brake quick release. I had almost no front brakes. I closed it while riding, cursed my stupidity, and then had a conservative descent to PCH. I would later realize that I left my tire lever on the side of the road.

The cruise on PCH was actually quite nice. However, I missed the second aid station because it was hidden a bit back from the road and I had my head down, frustrated from my flat, my low front tire pressure, and the fact that I realized that my front tire was not seated on the rim correctly. Little did I know, Claudia was waiting for me at the second aid station. She was tracking me on my location finder app. She saw me go right by, so she hopped in the car and caught up with me. She pulled over and luckily I'd brought my floor pump with me in the car. I got my front tire back up to 100 (psi), ate some food she had in the car, and hit the road again.

At about mile 43 the route turned from the PCH back to Camarillo farmland. By now, the Santa Ana winds had picked up. I had about 8 miles of flat, but with a strong wind blowing from my front right. It was pushing me into the road and slowing me down. It was like an 8 mile hill climb. It's the worst winds I've ever had to deal with on a bike. I was just slowly ticking down the miles trying to zone out. I'd later find out that guys with power meters were pushing 200-300 watts on the flats into the wind to sustain a 15-20 mph speed. That's nuts. Since I'd missed the second aid station, I was almost out of water. I had to ration to make sure I had something in case of emergency.

Finally I rolled in with Claudia cheering. I chugged some water. We went into the expo, but I was too fatigued to eat. We got plates of awesome food, but I just had to stare at it for about 15 minutes while alternating between a beer and a can of coke. I started to become myself again. It was a pretty spectacular journey. According to Strava I had an "Epic Suffer Score" based on my sustained heart rate. For some dumb reason I can't wait to do it again.

Grande Departe
Image

Image

View from the highway 23/Mulholland split, after the last big climb.
Image

https://www.facebook.com/claudia.choi.1 ... 927461128/

https://www.facebook.com/claudia.choi.1 ... 215526128/

Post ride cookie
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Ex-Pro Phil Gaimon and me.
Image
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby B_M_L on Thu Oct 26, 2017 11:13 am

Hey Ben - That sounds like an awesome ride.

I've seen some of Phil Gaimon's retirement clips on youtube so there was loads of build-up to this event. It's cool to hear from someone that did it.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby crustandcrumb on Thu Oct 26, 2017 1:05 pm

I'm riding an older custom touring frame that has got to be at least 9/6/9 OS. With me at ~120 lbs, thing should ride stiffer than flap, but thanks to the Compass Rat Trap Pass ultralights... let's just say the ride quality is staggering and I will never ride anything lesser. When I get a new frame I'll run Switchback Hills tubeless.

Supple tyres or bust.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby dontfeartheringo on Thu Oct 26, 2017 1:45 pm

benadrian wrote:I did a big bike ride this past weekend. I wrote about it on another forum, but thought I'd share here.

For the data-curious, here are a couple links:

https://www.strava.com/activities/1232217720
https://ridewithgps.com/trips/18438039

I was pretty nervous. I got gas down the street about a half mile from home, and I had to rush back home to poop. Normal nerves shit for me. But I gave myself plenty of time, and we showed up and the Camarillo airport hangar a half hour before my start time. I checked out the sponsors, filled my jersey pockets with free Clif shit, hit the can, set up my computer, and left with the whole group at 8:30. It was so nice having Claudia there. I told her she didn't have to come, but she seemed to want to see me ride my first big ride.

The first six miles were pretty easy. It was dusty, kind of windy farmland, but being in a peloton really helped, and we mainly had a tailwind. i did get a good amount of dirt in my mouth and some in my eyes, but hey, I'm expecting the outdoors to want to kill me. At seven miles in I got kicked in the dick with the first climb, which was about three miles. There's about a half mile of steeper climb with a 10% grade, then about two miles of 3-5% grade, finishing with a half mile or so of intense climb with sections of over 15% grade. It sucked. I went into unsustainable heart rates and had to stop a couple times to get back into my body's limits.

I had about two and a half miles of slight downhill and flats to recover. I gobbled some energy cubes. I looked at the houses of rich people. Then I hit a two mile climb with an average of 6% and max grades of 10%. Once again I had to pull off to take a short breather. The air was super dry and all my sweat was evaporating instantly. I could tell that I needed water even though I had no signs of having sweat too much. I was rewarded with a beautiful cruise through an area called Hidden Valley. That cruise ended at the first aid station about 21 miles in. I refilled my water bottles, ate a cookie and a half, and refilled my pockets with free cliff stuff... and a banana. Shit was about to get real.

After the aid station was a two mile climb with an average grade 8.1% and peak grades of 16.2%. The temperature was just about 90 degrees at this point. I tried to stay in my manageable heart rate zone, but I soon ended up in my 34/34 gear ratio and still hitting my max heart rates. In fact, if you look at the ridewithgps data, you can see me hit 178 bpm at mile 22.7, and then jump down to 134. I was standing under a tree trying not to drink all my water.

When that climb finished I felt both terrible and pretty amazing. I was rewarded with a 10 mile descent to PCH, and it was a blast. Well, it was a blast until about five miles in when I hit a pothole that I never saw while going 25-30 mph. My rim bottomed out and before I knew it my tire was getting really wobbly. Pinch flat. I pulled over under a tree, flipped my bike, and started changing my tube. All was well until I realized that I was surrounded by a hand full of bees. I was wearing high-visibility yellow, and the motherfucking bees were trying to pollinate me. I wasn't scared, but it annoyed the crap out of me because I couldn't move fast. I got my tube in and then my travel pump kept coming off of my valve stem. I got enough air in where I felt like I wasn't risking a wipeout. I got back on the bike and a few hundred feet later, just before a corner, I realized that I'd not closed my brake quick release. I had almost no front brakes. I closed it while riding, cursed my stupidity, and then had a conservative descent to PCH. I would later realize that I left my tire lever on the side of the road.

The cruise on PCH was actually quite nice. However, I missed the second aid station because it was hidden a bit back from the road and I had my head down, frustrated from my flat, my low front tire pressure, and the fact that I realized that my front tire was not seated on the rim correctly. Little did I know, Claudia was waiting for me at the second aid station. She was tracking me on my location finder app. She saw me go right by, so she hopped in the car and caught up with me. She pulled over and luckily I'd brought my floor pump with me in the car. I got my front tire back up to 100 (psi), ate some food she had in the car, and hit the road again.

At about mile 43 the route turned from the PCH back to Camarillo farmland. By now, the Santa Ana winds had picked up. I had about 8 miles of flat, but with a strong wind blowing from my front right. It was pushing me into the road and slowing me down. It was like an 8 mile hill climb. It's the worst winds I've ever had to deal with on a bike. I was just slowly ticking down the miles trying to zone out. I'd later find out that guys with power meters were pushing 200-300 watts on the flats into the wind to sustain a 15-20 mph speed. That's nuts. Since I'd missed the second aid station, I was almost out of water. I had to ration to make sure I had something in case of emergency.

Finally I rolled in with Claudia cheering. I chugged some water. We went into the expo, but I was too fatigued to eat. We got plates of awesome food, but I just had to stare at it for about 15 minutes while alternating between a beer and a can of coke. I started to become myself again. It was a pretty spectacular journey. According to Strava I had an "Epic Suffer Score" based on my sustained heart rate. For some dumb reason I can't wait to do it again.

Grande Departe
Image

Image

View from the highway 23/Mulholland split, after the last big climb.
Image

https://www.facebook.com/claudia.choi.1 ... 927461128/

https://www.facebook.com/claudia.choi.1 ... 215526128/

Post ride cookie
Image

Ex-Pro Phil Gaimon and me.
Image


You fucking stud. Hells yeah.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby Madman Munt on Thu Oct 26, 2017 7:33 pm

benadrian wrote:I did a big bike ride this past weekend.


Yeah! That looks like a great ride. Keep on riding up those hills!

Finally got a new fork on my bike. Now it looks like a complete mongrel- a skinny steel fork on a fat alu frame, in the wrong colour. It'll do for the time being. Feels so good to be back on the road.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby Madman Munt on Wed Nov 01, 2017 1:59 pm

As it's getting darker earlier and people are putting their lights on, my Bicycle/Bicycling Advice of the day is to please consider the effects of your newly purchased billion lumen laser beam on other road/path users. Do you need it on full at all times? Do you need to point the fucker at eye level? Do you think it is helpful to temporarily blind oncomers? I'm just a guy trying to ride my bike, not Philip K Dick receiving the Exegesis.

When I was a kid there would be adverts on the telly urging car drivers to dip their headlights. Now we have similarly bright lights available for bicycles, but the same message has not got across to cyclists. The idea seems to be brighter=better. Some of these guys are like freight trains bearing down on you from half a mile off. Even worse is extreme brightness + strobe flashing.

Ok, rant over. Now for some fun stuff:

phpBB [media]


I want one!
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby benadrian on Mon Jul 09, 2018 7:17 pm

I know this isn't a FOR SALE thread, but I live dangerously (no I don't). Anyway, i got a new bike and I need to sell my previous road bike.

2016 Specialized Roubaix SL4 - 56cm
Full info here:
https://losangeles.craigslist.org/lac/b ... 21612.html

I will ship in the lower 48 for a PRF person.

Thanks!

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