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Postby fiery jack on Fri Jul 20, 2007 9:08 am

we used to get quite a bit of it when I lived in Portugal, although admittedly it was generally pretty young beasts getting chopped. Roast kid, excellent.
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Postby Mark Hansen on Fri Jul 20, 2007 9:11 am

fiery jack wrote:
Colonel Panic wrote:I imagine it's nowhere near as nasty as goat.
?? I'm with the muslims on this one

GOAT IS GREAT


The few times I've had goat, in Indian food, I thought it was great as well.
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Postby Mark Hansen on Fri Jul 20, 2007 9:12 am

Colonel Panic wrote:Garlic and onions would make a cat turd palatable.

That's just a speculation, BTW. I have no anecdotal evidence for that one.


Don't tell my dog that, he likes cat turds just fine the way they are.
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Postby fiery jack on Fri Jul 20, 2007 9:14 am

Mark Hansen wrote:The few times I've had goat, in Indian food, I thought it was great as well.
true, I had a girlfriend who used to bring down excess goat curries that her mum had prepared for feasts etc.

they were grand.
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Postby Colonel Panic on Fri Jul 20, 2007 9:16 am

Yeah I had a goat curry at a Pakistani restaurant.

The curry was actually really good. It was kind of tart and was made with potatoes and peas.

The meat was in large pieces that looked like elongated pork chops and it had been simmering in the pot for so long that it was falling off the bone. It was extremely oily and the texture was a bit tough. It had a strange aftertaste. I imagine the same recipe would have been really good with lamb or pork substituted for the goat.
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Postby AlBStern on Fri Jul 20, 2007 9:38 am

I recently moved to a predominantly Indo-Paki neighborhood and they sell a lot of goat (or baby goat) there. I must admit, I've been a little intimidated in some of those butcher shops. Not exactly sure what cuts to request and/or how to prepare it.
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Postby itchy mcgoo on Fri Jul 20, 2007 12:12 pm

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Postby Nico Adie on Fri Jul 20, 2007 12:41 pm

Colonel Panic wrote:Somebody told me once that horse meat is gamy and tough and that it is not as nutritious as more popular large animal meats like pork, beef or lamb.

I've tried a few "unconventional" meats: venison, bison, rattlesnake, goat, ostrich, alligator and llama (I tried ostrich, alligator and llama for the first time at Grizzly's Lodge on Lincoln), but the idea of "eating a horse" always seemed kind of unappealing.

Come to think of it though, as bad as horse meat might possibly be, I imagine it's nowhere near as nasty as goat.

Is this just a cultural bias? Is horse meat actually good? Where can you get it in the US?


Horsemeat is possibly my favourite meat, but it is slightly more tricky to prepare than beef, pork or lamb. This is because it has less inherent fat. To counteract this, if I'm cooking a horse roast I'd tend to use about 1/2lb of butter or lard or goosefat. Maybe more, depending on the size of the piece of meat.

On two occasions in France I've had carpaccio horsemeat with fois gras on grilled, thinly sliced baguette. It was incredible.

Try carpaccio-ing it if you ever manage to get some. I have no idea how to get it in America.
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Postby Mark Hansen on Fri Jul 20, 2007 12:46 pm

Nico Adie wrote:
Colonel Panic wrote:Somebody told me once that horse meat is gamy and tough and that it is not as nutritious as more popular large animal meats like pork, beef or lamb.

I've tried a few "unconventional" meats: venison, bison, rattlesnake, goat, ostrich, alligator and llama (I tried ostrich, alligator and llama for the first time at Grizzly's Lodge on Lincoln), but the idea of "eating a horse" always seemed kind of unappealing.

Come to think of it though, as bad as horse meat might possibly be, I imagine it's nowhere near as nasty as goat.

Is this just a cultural bias? Is horse meat actually good? Where can you get it in the US?


Horsemeat is possibly my favourite meat, but it is slightly more tricky to prepare than beef, pork or lamb. This is because it has less inherent fat. To counteract this, if I'm cooking a horse roast I'd tend to use about 1/2lb of butter or lard or goosefat. Maybe more, depending on the size of the piece of meat.

On two occasions in France I've had carpaccio horsemeat with fois gras on grilled, thinly sliced baguette. It was incredible.

Try carpaccio-ing it if you ever manage to get some. I have no idea how to get it in America.


As far as I know, it's not legal to sell horsemeat for human consumption in the U.S.

They're also trying to ban processing it for human consumption and then selling that processed meat overseas even. I think there is either a procesing plant or proposed processing plant in Illinois this will affect.

Eat dog food.
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Postby llllllllllllllllllllllll on Sun Jul 22, 2007 6:29 pm

caix wrote:I'm gonna bring out the big guns for this one.

Caix's 'Impress Your Friends' or 'Get Laid' Chicken and Pasta


Alright, I tried this, and it was a fucking success.

Did a couple of things differently - marinated the chicken in buttermilk, red pepper, and garlic power for a few hours.

Added a couple of cans tomato sauce (was cooking for about 6 people), a few dashes worcestershire, brown sugar, and Tony's. I could've left it as is, but I had to adjust for a southern palette.

Anyways, this is a great recipe. Granted, I haven't gotten laid yet, but the night is still young. Salut!
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Postby dlayphoto on Sun Jul 22, 2007 6:50 pm

The paper I contribute to has a pretty good food column, chock full of gourmet recipes:

http://www.lakewoodobserver.com/read/op ... chef-geoff

EDIT: Want to get laid? Try this one:

http://www.lakewoodobserver.com/read/op ... le-romance
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Postby Rimbaud III on Sun Jul 29, 2007 11:37 am

WANTED:

A kick-arse coffee and walnut cake recipe with which to blow minds (psychotropic hallucinogens should NOT form the basis for any of your suggestions).
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Postby Jodi S. on Sun Jul 29, 2007 5:30 pm

I have a good coffee/chocolate cake recipe, would that help? I guess you can add walnuts.

I am now trying to emulate the lime-cilantro rice they make at Chipotle because, dammit, I am making cuban chicken and want good rice with it.
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Postby Rimbaud III on Mon Jul 30, 2007 3:57 am

burun wrote:I have a good coffee/chocolate cake recipe, would that help?


Yes, it would. Screw the walnuts.

Hit me.
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Postby Jodi S. on Mon Jul 30, 2007 9:55 am

BITTERSWEET CHOCOLATE POUND CAKE


Cake:
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 1/2 cups water
2 tablespoons instant coffee
6 oz. unsweetened chocolate, broken into pieces
2 cups granulated sugar
1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 large eggs

Chocolate Glaze:
2 oz. unsweetened chocolate
3 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 1/2 cups sifted powdered sugar
2 to 3 tablespoons water
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Powdered sugar (optional)


1. Preheat oven to 325 F. Grease 10-inch bundt pan.

2. For the Cake: Combine flour, baking soda and baking powder in small
bowl. Bring water and coffee to a boil in small saucepan; remove from heat.
Add 6 oz. baking chocolate; stir until smooth.

3. Beat sugar, butter and vanilla extract in large mixer bowl until
creamy. Add eggs; beat on high speed for 5 minutes. Beat in flour mixture
alternately with chocolate mixture. Pour into prepared bundt pan.

4. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in cake comes
out clean. Cool in pan on wire rack for 30 minutes. Invert onto wire rack
to cool completely. Drizzle with Chocolate Glaze; sprinkle with powdered
sugar.

5. For Chocolate Glaze: Melt baking bar and butter in small, heavy-duty
saucepan over low heat, stirring until smooth. Remove from heat. Stir in
powdered sugar alternately with water until of desired consistency. Stir in
vanilla extract.

I have played around with this recipe a bit, and have also replaced the water with strong brewed coffee (in addition to the instant coffee) with decent results.

And then there's this recipe from Alfred Portale (of Gotham)

Warm Chocolate Cake
Makes 12 servings

Thinking Ahead: This cake cools in a turned-off oven for 2 hours, and
should be refrigerated for at least 4 hours. It ca also be frozen for up to
1 week, wrapped well in plastic wrap and then aluminum foil.

Special Equipment: one 10-inch round springform pan (optional)

1 pound high-quality bittersweet chocolate, preferably Callebaut or Lindt,
finely chopped
3 ounces high- quality unsweetened chocolate, finely chopped
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons strong brewed coffee
6 large eggs, at room temperature
3/4 cup sugar
1 cup heavy cream
Cocoa powder, for serving
Super-premium vanilla, coffee, almond, or espresso ice cream

Preheat the oven to 325F. Lightly butter the inside of a 10-inch round
cake pan. (you can use a springform pan if the bottom is tight-fitting.)
Line the bottom of the pan with a circle of parchment paper.

In the top part of a double boiler or in a large metal bowl set over a
medium sauce pan of simmering, not boiling, water, melt the bittersweet and
unsweetened chocolates with the coffee.

Meanwhile, in the bowl of a heavy-duty electric mixer, whisk the eggs and
sugar. Set the bowl over a medium saucepan of simmering, not boiling water,
and whisk until the mixture is warm to the touch and the sugar is
dissolved, about 2 minutes. Rub a little of the mixture between your thumb
and finger to test it. Attach the bowl to the mixer and beat at medium-high
speed until light and almost tripled in volume, about 3 minutes. Reduce
the speed to medium-low and continue beating for another 2 minutes. Set
aside.

In a chilled bowl, beat the cream just past the soft-peak stage, until it
dollops nicely and holds its shape when dropped from a spoon onto a plate.
If the whipped cream is too soft, the cake will be airy. If too firm, the
cake may be dry.

Fold a quarter of the egg mixture into the chocolate mixture. Fold this
lightened chocolate mixture back into the remaining egg mixture. Fold in
the whipped cream. Transfer to the prepared pan, smooth the top, and tap
the filled pan lightly on the work surface a few times to settle any air
pockets.

Place the pan in a larger baking pan and put in the oven. Add enough hot
water to the baking pan to come halfway up the sides of the cake pan. Bake
for 30 minutes. Open the oven door for 30 seconds to release any excess
moisture that builds in the oven. Continue baking until the center of the
cake feels somewhat firm when pressed lightly with your fingers, another 20
to 30 minutes. Let the cake cool in the turned-off oven for 2 hours.

Run a warm knife around the inside of the pan, and carefully unmold the
cake onto a 10-inch cardboard round or an ovenproof serving platter. Peel
off the parchment paper. Wrap the cake tightly in plastic wrap and
refrigerate until well chilled and firm, at least 4 hours or overnight.

Using a thin-bladed slicing knife dipped into hot water, cut the chilled
cake into 12 wedges. Wipe the knife clean between slices. Do not separate
the slices. Rewrap the entire cake in plastic wrap and refrigerate or
freeze.

Remove cake from refrigerator or freezer and allow it to return to room
temperature (allow 4 hours if frozen). At least 1 hour before serving the
cake, preheat the oven to its lowest setting (or lower the temperature if
you have used the oven for other cooking). Place the plastic-wrapped cake
on a baking sheet. Transfer it to the oven and let the cake slowly warm
through, at least 30 minutes and up to 3 hours. It will remain perfectly
fine in the oven throughout dinner and be ready when needed.

To serve, unwrap the warmed cake and sift cocoa powder over the top.
Transfer the slices to dessert plates. Garnish each serving with a scoop of
ice cream.

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Postby Rimbaud III on Mon Jul 30, 2007 10:02 am

Thanks Burun!

Will report back once I've baked it.
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Postby Jodi S. on Wed Aug 01, 2007 3:02 pm

Image

Part of the ongoing "dinner challenge" series, in which I buy three ingredients and try to cook a tasty dish with them.

I enjoy zucchini flowers but have never cooked them myself, so this should be interesting.

I think the protein will be a nice tuna steak I have, but it could also be some veal. I haven't decided yet.
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Postby night_tools on Wed Aug 01, 2007 8:41 pm

Tonight's dinner was some very sketchily cut rainbow trout fillets (my first attempt at filleting a real fish - didn't really have the right knife) nevertheless very delicious.

Trout fillets went in a foil parcel with

1x chopped tomato
6x torn basil leaves
splash of raspberry vinegar
splash of white wine
fresh black pepper
some sea salt
2 'cakes' of frozen spinach

and got baked in the oven for about 25 minutes (maybe should have been a bit less).
Served with fried potatoes w/ onion and some boiled kale.
and some wine, while watching Venture Bros season 2.
Very tasty.
You're a shit MD and I want my pizza money back.
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Postby boilermaker on Wed Aug 01, 2007 10:41 pm

PARROT PIE

Recipe By : Mrs. Beeton
Serving Size : 12
Categories : Australian Poultry

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
12 Parakeets *
6 Thin slices of lean beef, 4
4 Rashers of bacon, 3
3 Hard-boiled eggs
1/2 ts Finely chopped parsley
1/4 ts Dried parsley
Finely grated lemon peel
Salt & pepper
Puff pastry
Flour

* Parakeets are a small, long-tailed tropical parrot.

Method: Prepare the birds, and truss them like a quail
or any other small bird. Line a pie-dish with the
beef, over it place 6 of the paraquets, intersperse
slices of egg, parsley and lemon-rind, dredge lightly
with flour, and season with salt and pepper. Cover
with the bacon cut into strips, lay the rest of the
birds on the top, intersperse slices of egg, season
with salt and pepper, and sprinkle with parsley and
lemon-rind as before; three-quarter fill the dish with
cold water, cover with puff-pastry, and bake in a quick
oven.

Time: About 2-1/2 hours. SUFFICIENT for about 12
persons.

From Mrs. Beeton's All About Cookery, Ward, Lock &
Co., Limited, date unknown.
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Postby yaledelay on Wed Aug 01, 2007 11:33 pm

Rimbaud III wrote:WANTED:

A kick-arse coffee and walnut cake recipe with which to blow minds (psychotropic hallucinogens should NOT form the basis for any of your suggestions).



my Grandma makes one hell of a walnut and apple coffee cake... I will bug her on the 11th...
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