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The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.)

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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby jimmy two hands on Fri Nov 13, 2015 5:16 pm

bishopdante wrote:Image


What's all that water for, anyway? Are they bottling diva tears?
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby bishopdante on Mon Nov 16, 2015 4:51 am

jimmy two hands wrote:What's all that water for, anyway? Are they bottling diva tears?


Any tears. Any emotion. Everybody's data.

PRISM / Snowden era Internet is not 1995 Internet. A pretty explosive shift in capacity and availability has happened over those 20 years in the personal computer business.

Used to be the feds couldn't keep up... more data travelled than the snoops could store.

Today we have nearly everything running over the Internet, and the big international pipelines are tapped. Not 100%, but the majority of traffic can be assumed to be harvested.

Computers scarier the the seventies? The power today of the whole system put together... and who has access to to the top levels of this system...

Is probably the scariest thing I have ever contemplated.

And she is doing what on YouTube? Google''s property... Google count the CIA/NSA/INQTEL among their highest paying clients/shareholders, and the two founders of the company park the company 747 in the local CIA airbase, which is pretty high security. The Googleplex is the old SGI headquarters, they were supplying plenty software and hardware for the NSA/CIA back in the 90s, I would guess that the cable run to the military facility is a few hundred meters.

_____________

Cybercrime / trolling is what I would probably be primarily scared of posting tearful cries for personal attention online on a public website, thinking it is a public matter, or that online publishing systems are intimate and supportive.

If she got severely harassed, then killed herself (see 8 years earlier vlogging escalating abuse victim Kiki kannibal - are you quite sure you want to be "Internet famous" ? ), doubt the NSA would be doing much apart from using it as political collateral to justify more surveillance. So...

... in the UK soon they propose the police will have routine potentially warrantless access to people's browsing history (gchq obviously have it already).

_____________

The active cooling systems for a very high density computer install. If the cooling systems fail... it catches fire.

http://www.cnet.com/news/nsas-new-data- ... -failures/

Now of course when a building full of government or financial records catches fire, one has every right to be suspicious about what was lost, and was it foul play, but it is fairly likely that the computers are just so densely packed that when the hugely powerful system crashes and goes into a feedback loop, everything can get very hot.

It is currently using water cooling, but may require oil cooling.

High performance computers often employ cryogenic cooling, but the flammable big data facility... that is just data storage. Think of it as the NSA's hard drive. You have one the size of a fag packet... theirs is that size, and probably has a bunch of stuff bunkerised under ground, although the serious deep underground stuff is elsewhere.in mountainous areas. That is *big* *scary* *data*, whether you are a fireman, sysadmin, NSA technician or director, or a civilian, journalist, whistleblower or psychopathically deranged amphetamjne munching IS guerilla. Scary computing? 100% the scary one.

We are not talking every single packet that moves online, but we are talking close to every single packet.

It is one thing to have all that data... but how on earth are you going to find anything in that byzantine data pile?! And what sort of progress bars are involved? Beyond CERN level performance is required.

Goodness knows what software and what hardware it runs.

Suffice to say it probably isn't PHP or iOS.
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby Anthony Flack on Mon Nov 16, 2015 4:05 pm

bishopdante wrote:Computers scarier the the seventies?


This lyric about computers being scarier in the 70s is from a song called 'I Wish I Was a Punk Rocker (With Flowers In My Hair)'.

Draw your own conclusions.
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby bishopdante on Mon Dec 07, 2015 5:15 am

Welcome to the UK's finest list of corporate intellectual-property pimps:

http://www.ukispcourtorders.co.uk/

Try visiting any of the filesharing websites on that list, pirate bay, isohunt etc... via a UK internet connection, you'll reach that page.

Is it software companies whose rights are being infringed? Was it apple, Microsoft, Adobe...

The cartel who made the claims & sank the pirate ship: BPI, MPA, Premiere League... Cartier / Mont Blanc, eh.

______

All the rights to most of the 20th century's media have, during the "wild west" period of the internet, been conglomerated at pennies to the pound. Now that the rights are all consolidated, the taxing and competition suppression can begin.

_______

This could get very corrupt, possession becoming 10 10ths of the law.

Problem is, this sort of Intellectual Property law will be expanded fairly shortly past originally-authored media to software, patents, products, pharmaceuticals... getting a court order will become a rubber-stamp automated affair.

_______

For example, in the future Ed Snowden's revelations could be considered very valuable (military) intellectual property infringement, and any website publishing the details could have their domain name redirected to a table of court orders.

If piracy is considered a crime, the secret tools for catching them could become very illegal to even discuss online...

Here's where surveillance was at in 2008:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_ANT_catalog
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby pb183max on Mon Dec 07, 2015 5:25 am

jimmy two hands wrote:
bishopdante wrote:Image


What's all that water for, anyway? Are they bottling diva tears?


chilled water for the air conditioning/temperature control
oh and waterboarding
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby Mason on Thu Mar 10, 2016 3:13 pm

How Pentagon Black’s new paper compilation unites DIY bands across Canada

Not sharing this for the compilation (which I'm sure is good) or the "paper record" idea (a graphic designer's take on the merch+download thing), but for this bit:

Where record labels may not have the same power they once did in the indie sphere, publicists arguably have more. In fact, Biesinger and his Famines bandmate Drew Demers did a study of the November 2015 issue of Exclaim! and found that 93.5% of the bands covered had publicists.

Exclaim! being Canada's indie rock/pop paper of record, essentially. So lots of Arcade Fire/Drake coverage, sure, but in years past they've covered friends of mine who had no national reputation or marketing resources.

Exhaustive list of everyone who benefited from the alleged utopian meritocracy where "now you can put songs on MySpace for free and the good work will just share itself":
- The Pack, with "Vans"
-
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby Bernardo on Thu Mar 10, 2016 3:53 pm

Mason wrote: Biesinger and his Famines bandmate Drew Demers did a study of the November 2015 issue of Exclaim! and found that 93.5% of the bands covered had publicists.[/i]


Brazil is just like that right now.
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby parker_knoll on Sat Mar 12, 2016 6:42 pm

Bernardo wrote:
Mason wrote: Biesinger and his Famines bandmate Drew Demers did a study of the November 2015 issue of Exclaim! and found that 93.5% of the bands covered had publicists.[/i]


Brazil is just like that right now.


is this something new?
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby Mason on Sun Mar 13, 2016 2:54 pm

It's absolutely more commonplace than it was 5-10 years ago, a lot more, though no more/less pernicious than it ever was.

The accepted narrative is that Because The Internet, etc., the signal-to-noise ratio of independent musicians has been flattened. And pretty much the way I account for it is that with (theoretically) fewer gatekeepers in the way, jag-offs with throwing-around money have found a way to introduce artificial gatekeepers.

Some friends and/or current bandmates of mine were in a (micro-) buzz band in my hometown just over five years ago. At one point their label, a local thing but with enough connections to Make Things Happen for them, told them they needed to hire a publicist. Out of their own pocket yet. Their response was no -- even if we felt like it, we're all students and there's no way we can afford it. So their label quit cooperating with them altogether and they ended up putting their next album out as a personal run of CD-Rs. This is anecdotal but all I mean to show is that PR is increasingly a prerequisite, even among smaller-scale communities of folks who should know better.

Not that PR is the only issue of power relations within "indie rock" or whatever, but it really should be the most avoidable. For anyone who's ever cared about alternative cultures or artistic communities, it's surprising it'd ever even come up. So I'm sad we have to contend with it and watch not only opportunist peers but well-meaning friends get sucked into it.
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby Seby on Mon Mar 14, 2016 7:15 am

Mason wrote:This is anecdotal but all I mean to show is that PR is increasingly a prerequisite, even among smaller-scale communities of folks who should know better.

Not that PR is the only issue of power relations within "indie rock" or whatever, but it really should be the most avoidable. For anyone who's ever cared about alternative cultures or artistic communities, it's surprising it'd ever even come up. So I'm sad we have to contend with it and watch not only opportunist peers but well-meaning friends get sucked into it.


"[S]ucked into it" might be understating things a little. "Seeking it out and sucking its dick" would be more accurate.

And I am referring to my own friends here. Grr..
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby Anthony Flack on Mon Mar 14, 2016 4:33 pm

Hire a publicist? All right then. All marketing-related correspondence should be directed to our associate, Dr P. Buttface.
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby elisha wiesner on Mon Mar 14, 2016 7:23 pm

Mason wrote:It's absolutely more commonplace than it was 5-10 years ago, a lot more, though no more/less pernicious than it ever was.


Are you saying that needing a publicist to get a band into magazines etc.. is more commonplace now than it was 5-10 years ago? I seriously doubt that. I would think it's the same as it's been for a long time.
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby Adam Sr on Sun Mar 27, 2016 11:22 am

phpBB [media]
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby parker_knoll on Tue Mar 29, 2016 4:49 pm

Mason wrote:It's absolutely more commonplace than it was 5-10 years ago, a lot more, though no more/less pernicious than it ever was.

The accepted narrative is that Because The Internet, etc., the signal-to-noise ratio of independent musicians has been flattened. And pretty much the way I account for it is that with (theoretically) fewer gatekeepers in the way, jag-offs with throwing-around money have found a way to introduce artificial gatekeepers.

Some friends and/or current bandmates of mine were in a (micro-) buzz band in my hometown just over five years ago. At one point their label, a local thing but with enough connections to Make Things Happen for them, told them they needed to hire a publicist. Out of their own pocket yet. Their response was no -- even if we felt like it, we're all students and there's no way we can afford it. So their label quit cooperating with them altogether and they ended up putting their next album out as a personal run of CD-Rs. This is anecdotal but all I mean to show is that PR is increasingly a prerequisite, even among smaller-scale communities of folks who should know better.

Not that PR is the only issue of power relations within "indie rock" or whatever, but it really should be the most avoidable. For anyone who's ever cared about alternative cultures or artistic communities, it's surprising it'd ever even come up. So I'm sad we have to contend with it and watch not only opportunist peers but well-meaning friends get sucked into it.


People want gatekeepers, i don't think there's anything artificial about it. It's just that their gatekeepers might be their {insert social media outlet name} friends. After all, the new mantra is that curation is the skill of our era.

There were always publicists. Even things that didn't look like they were done with publicity were done with publicity. When it's good it's a hidden hand. There's no point not giving a fuck if no one can see you not giving a fuck and write about how much you don't give a fuck. If you wanted to get out of the fanzines and into the press there was always a publicist to bring those journos and "tastemakers" to the gig, whether it was the band, the label, or a third agent.
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby bishopdante on Tue Mar 29, 2016 6:55 pm

Adam Sr wrote:
phpBB [media]


Confiscation of the surplus + accelerating automation & the elimination of the necessity for human labour = crashing monetary value of human labour. In the "first world" today, too many roles are now populated by a conveyor belt of unpaid interns, whether in banking or the "creative industries".

Anybody who works with automated systems will tell you that people are required to supervise and maintain such systems. To optimise or solve problems it's not enough to go by the warning lights that the commissioning engineer put in — to troubleshoot and maintain up-time you need to know what's going on in detail. Too many automated systems are designed around user-stupidity, replacing skilled people with button-pushers. Employing automated systems is a job not many people know about, which is a worry.

Many things that could be automated are not. Many hazardous, mind-numbing and gruelling jobs that could and should be done by robots are done by people, often children, often with no shoes let alone insufficient safety gear... because people living in crushing poverty are *cheaper*. Technology that could be employed productively is marketed as entertainment. Moore's law and digital obsolescence casts a toxic shadow called "backyard recycling":

phpBB [media]


phpBB [media]


It's almost like human beings themselves have been declared the surplus, on a continental scale. Magnates sit in shady conferences saying "there's too many people in this world" and "there isn't enough to go around", and some people online would have you believe that the rich are, behind the scenes, planning on murdering a whole bunch of 'em. Certainly David Rockefeller, the century-old environmental criminal now on his 6th heart transplant has delivered a few speeches which could be summarised in the sentence: "the problem with poverty is the poor, if we could just get rid of them, we'd be just great".

Ownership of the means of production is too often driven by monopolisation of the benefits, rather than distribution of the goods, or a sense of social good.

Conversely, the businesses that commercially succeed in the real world are often driven by a desire equip people with the means of production, diversify the possibilities, finding new efficiencies, cutting out the error and the waste, charging cost plus markup and keeping the margin when they don't screw up.

Where labour is reduced to zero value, industry degrades to pursuing ground rent as the only form of monetary transfer, and the economic feedback of this leads to one of two things, inflation or stagnation. We've got both today. Ground rent, be it on intellectual property or on land, is not productive, it's a tax.

Marx most certainly remarked upon this race-to-the-bottom crash of the value of labour reaching zero monetary value as an inevitable symptom of late-stage capitalism as labour-saving efficiency reaches total automation.

The current model of the internet reflects it: the money isn't in uploading or downloading, the money is in collecting revenues from renting infrastructure: fiber optic cables & server-farms.

___________

Catia is the shiznit. The world would be better if it was free or socialised – it's a means of production which could be distributed with no material cost. The failure of its availability is artificial scarcity, and the world is no better for it. Work could get done with it that isn't getting done, there's a big value in any software which is down to how many people "speak the language". I wish they'd open source it.

___________

Where I think Marx's foresight falls down is that he underestimated the possibility for personal ownership of the means of production as a good – collectivising factories doesn't have to happen if you can produce miniaturised production systems which can be personally acquired, were it not for the pricetag Catia would be one of those. Marx doesn't talk about robots or software. It's getting to the point where individuals can mass-produce without considering armies of labourers or enormous investment-capital with the corresponding strings attached. The industrial model is not the only way, communism isn't the only solution.

Free association is good, as is personal autonomy. Money in the equation isn't needed for there to be many benefits. Let's face it... gravity doesn't come with a bill. Physics doesn't use currency symbols.

Bankers usually aren't scientists. Economists often suffer from "physics envy". Too many politicians, financiers, managers and executives are nothing more than hustlers in my view.

___________

Institutional monopolisation / confiscation of the results or rewards of productivity are happening. The corporate-ISP closed-source sysadmin'd datacenter limited-access Google-IPO "data in the cloud" Internet is too often exactly that phenomenon – an annexation of what could be the commons, marketed as the commons but in reality private, corporate property, doing deals with the community's data, the details of which are kept fairly quiet. How does facebook make its money? What are they selling, and to whom? You might well ask. Those who know have signed strict confidentiality agreements.

___________

Poverty is evil, and the problem with capitalism is that its ownership/control systems engineer poverty for the majority. The best thing that large organisations be they governments or companies could be doing is making sure that people don't bloody die of it, or get enslaved by attempting to constantly mitigate its presence, pursuing dwindling labour-roles and being undercut by automation. Poverty is corrosive and toxic.

___________

People have to live, they have to eat. Who owns the minerals. Who owns the land. Who owns the agriculture. How well is it managed?

The problem with those industries is that they're most profitably run in the short term according to highly antisocial and unscientific principals.

One of the biggest and most philosophically underrated problems in the economics equation is irrational people. Megalomania. Greed and hatred.

The schadenfreude of feeling that one is in some perverse way better off or empowered in witnessing others grovel and suffer, too many global concerns are dictated by "king of the hill" male ego BS and hubris.

___________

Things that should not be driven by a sense of profit, or made artificially scarce by money-grubbing profit-motive pirates with private armies:

Agriculture, mineral extraction, materials science, information systems, education, communications systems, automation systems, mass-transport infrastructure, emergency services, policing, the military, housing, healthcare, clean water, energy, roads, forestry, oceans, etc.

These materials or territories should not be exclusive, or personal property to be used & abused by a power-hungry individual's personal whims or psychology. There's probably no way of eliminating mistakes or politics, not even by employing sci-fi artificial intelligence systems. However, better could surely be done, by focusing on the process rather than the financial gains, and if humanity is to have a future of aeons rather than decades, that's a transformation that'll have to happen. In the past two centuries we've done a catastrophic amount of damage to the ecology, and the pace of damage and depletion is accelerating.

___________

How has the internet changed coal mining, or oil drilling? Same old same old. It's resolutely materialistic. Capitalist.

The economic structure of the internet and the centralisation of information in massive privately owned data-silos has arguably made it easier for these enterprises to manage their PR, and offers powerful new opportunities to suppress dissent and activism. Given a few "international trade agreement" intellectual property laws to enforce "intellectual property", and the "financial decline of the media", it could become as illegal to blow the whistle on heavy industry as it is to rob a bank, and "unwelcome" information could be expunged from the world's data systems with a lawyer's form-letter.

Labour saving electronic control systems, networked information, there's some information-revolution & automation penetration, but at root it's heavy-industrial politics no different from the 19th century. Heavy industry runs the modern world, behind the scenes.

Heavier the industry, the more capitalistic the politics of it are, and the stronger the arguments for classical Marxist collectivised / communist ownership and rigorously publicly-accountable scientific management.

____________

Diamonds are carbon. Were it not for DeBeers, whose designated purpose for such carbon-lattices is for them to be employed as wealth-representing ornamental gemstones, and keep the prices of decorative gemstones extremely high by re-burying diamonds under blocks of concrete the size of olympic swimming pools and assassinating scientists who attempt to make them artificially, chances are they'd be cheap enough to make microchips and machine-tools out of. Possibly even windows.
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby enframed on Tue Apr 19, 2016 10:46 pm

Jumping around wikipedia brought me here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/300_Entertainment

Funding
The company is getting backing from a wide range of investors; Google (which has put in around $5 million),[citation needed] investment firm Columbus Nova, Israeli-American hedge fund billionaire Noam Gottesman’s Toms Capital, former Warner Music digital chief Alex Zubillaga, Kemado Records' co-founder Andres Santo Domingo and several other investors.[citation needed] The investment agreements were pulled together by media investment banker Aryeh Bourkoff and Ori Winitze] of LionTree.[8]

Twitter
In February 2014, 300 signed a deal to partner with Twitter that will allow 300 full access to the company’s data—including information unavailable to the public, such as tags that reveal the location from which a tweet was sent, in order to discover artists at an early stage and help develop them.[9]
Records for sale.

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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby jimmy two hands on Thu Apr 21, 2016 10:10 am

enframed wrote:Jumping around wikipedia brought me here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/300_Entertainment

Funding
The company is getting backing from a wide range of investors; Google (which has put in around $5 million),[citation needed] investment firm Columbus Nova, Israeli-American hedge fund billionaire Noam Gottesman’s Toms Capital, former Warner Music digital chief Alex Zubillaga, Kemado Records' co-founder Andres Santo Domingo and several other investors.[citation needed] The investment agreements were pulled together by media investment banker Aryeh Bourkoff and Ori Winitze] of LionTree.[8]

Twitter
In February 2014, 300 signed a deal to partner with Twitter that will allow 300 full access to the company’s data—including information unavailable to the public, such as tags that reveal the location from which a tweet was sent, in order to discover artists at an early stage and help develop them.[9]


I wonder if they've tried to sign Sparta.
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby enframed on Thu Apr 21, 2016 11:56 am

jimmy two hands wrote:
enframed wrote:Jumping around wikipedia brought me here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/300_Entertainment

Funding
The company is getting backing from a wide range of investors; Google (which has put in around $5 million),[citation needed] investment firm Columbus Nova, Israeli-American hedge fund billionaire Noam Gottesman’s Toms Capital, former Warner Music digital chief Alex Zubillaga, Kemado Records' co-founder Andres Santo Domingo and several other investors.[citation needed] The investment agreements were pulled together by media investment banker Aryeh Bourkoff and Ori Winitze] of LionTree.[8]

Twitter
In February 2014, 300 signed a deal to partner with Twitter that will allow 300 full access to the company’s data—including information unavailable to the public, such as tags that reveal the location from which a tweet was sent, in order to discover artists at an early stage and help develop them.[9]


I wonder if they've tried to sign Sparta.


Ha! I was thinking that here is a guy who understands that the music biz has changed and he's adapting to it. What I can't figure out is why Google would invest in 300, except just for fun. I can see why 300 would want to associate with Google though, same reason they want Twitter access.
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby Cilantro on Fri Jun 03, 2016 9:12 am

Breaking news...we should all stop making records. According to Roger Daltrey, there's no point:

http://teamrock.com/news/2016-06-01/roger-daltrey-there-s-no-music-industry-anymore-why-would-we-make-an-album
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Re: The Problem With Music: Still a Problem (Cracker/CVB ed.

Postby travis k on Fri Jun 03, 2016 9:43 am

"I can't afford to do that. I've got other things I could waste the money on."
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