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Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby Teacher's Pet on Sat Sep 16, 2017 1:14 pm

Yesterday I had the opportunity to hear some records played back on some high-end equipment.

"High-end" is putting it mildly, it was the kind of gear that looks like it was made by some steampunk Amish NASA wizard. It probably cost several years of my salary. The speakers wouldn't have fit into my living room.

No shit, I've never heard anything like it. It was incredible.
I woke up thinking about the sound.

I heard detail. Such tiny detail. And space.
It was loud but it didn't hurt, I could have listened all night.

I never believed in this shit before, but I do now.
Kinda like taking mushrooms for the first time.
I experienced something I never knew was possible.

:shock: :shock:
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby enframed on Sat Sep 16, 2017 3:16 pm

Teacher's Pet wrote:
I heard detail. Such tiny detail. And space.
It was loud but it didn't hurt
, I could have listened all night.

I never believed in this shit before, but I do now.
Kinda like taking mushrooms for the first time.
I experienced something I never knew was possible.


Yes, I have experienced the same at some audio show on a system that must have cost several hundred thousand dollars. It was incredible.
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby Rodabod on Sat Sep 16, 2017 4:24 pm

Teacher's Pet wrote:No shit, I've never heard anything like it. It was incredible.
I woke up thinking about the sound.

I heard detail. Such tiny detail. And space.
It was loud but it didn't hurt, I could have listened all night.

I never believed in this shit before, but I do now.
Kinda like taking mushrooms for the first time.
I experienced something I never knew was possible.


Which Coconut Audio interconnects were these?
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby numberthirty on Sat Sep 16, 2017 6:20 pm

Teacher's Pet wrote:some steampunk Amish NASA wizard.


If I knew for sure that this band was either prog or math rock, I would probably go see them.
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby travis k on Sat Sep 16, 2017 10:23 pm

I bet the NASA wizard's system didn't even have any tweaks yet.
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby bishopdante on Sun Sep 17, 2017 8:07 pm

Teacher's Pet wrote:Yesterday I had the opportunity to hear some records played back on some high-end equipment.

"High-end" is putting it mildly, it was the kind of gear that looks like it was made by some steampunk Amish NASA wizard. It probably cost several years of my salary. The speakers wouldn't have fit into my living room.

No shit, I've never heard anything like it. It was incredible.
I woke up thinking about the sound.

I heard detail. Such tiny detail. And space.
It was loud but it didn't hurt, I could have listened all night.

I never believed in this shit before, but I do now.
Kinda like taking mushrooms for the first time.
I experienced something I never knew was possible.

:shock: :shock:


That's what I got off quested 412s, apart from the visuals.

Suggest that you check out a good room fitted with those and see how that compares. Best I've heard.

Good sound quality and loads of headroom is a good thing. Generally my biggest gripe with the obsessive hifi crew is that they obsess over equipment and don't do any work on the acoustic space, which to my mind is the most important factor. No matter what gear you use, a concrete car park is a concrete car park.
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby Bernardo on Tue Nov 07, 2017 2:05 am

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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby Thanasis on Tue Nov 07, 2017 4:49 am

Bernardo wrote:this goes here, I think

http://pitchfork.com/features/interview ... new-album/


Yeah. How much better is it really gonna sound? And I bet it's going to be expensive too. I'll pass.
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby Sprague Dawley on Tue Nov 07, 2017 5:04 am

tough thread to follow. AudioTruth, did you get your cables back?

AudioTruth wrote:
tallchris wrote:But do you make a version of these $80k cables "for women"?

Yes I do, they are pink and black.

wft. So now my black wife needs pink cables?
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby MatthewK on Tue Nov 07, 2017 5:11 am

Sprague Dawley wrote:
AudioTruth wrote:
tallchris wrote:But do you make a version of these $80k cables "for women"?

Yes I do, they are pink and black.

wft. So now my black wife needs pink cables?

You weren't listening closely, he said that *women* are pink and black.
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby Sprague Dawley on Tue Nov 07, 2017 5:24 am

MatthewK wrote:You weren't listening closely, he said that *women* are pink and black.

So where do i connect the pink cables to a black woman?
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby enframed on Wed Nov 08, 2017 6:47 pm

Thanasis wrote:
Bernardo wrote:this goes here, I think

http://pitchfork.com/features/interview ... new-album/


Yeah. How much better is it really gonna sound? And I bet it's going to be expensive too. I'll pass.


Jesus, another one.
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby Bernardo on Wed Nov 08, 2017 8:55 pm

enframed wrote:
Thanasis wrote:
Bernardo wrote:this goes here, I think

http://pitchfork.com/features/interview ... new-album/


Yeah. How much better is it really gonna sound? And I bet it's going to be expensive too. I'll pass.


Jesus, another one.


I thought this bordered on disturbing:

Creating the vinyl master of Loveless turned out to be another multi-year project beset by financial and technical difficulties. First, Shields needed money for studio time and to pay engineers, cash that didn’t come through until the band toured two years ago.

But funding turned out to be the easy part. To do a version of Loveless entirely in the analog domain is a tricky thing, because back in 1991, when the record was mastered for CD, LP, and cassette, digital methods were used in its final editing and mastering stages. Loveless is defined by its sequencing and flow, and the brief transitions and interludes between tracks are part of what makes the album special. Those transitions were created at least in part using computers, so to re-create them using purely analog technology meant going back to the original tapes and reconstructing them by hand using tape splices.

That was part of Shields’ task for the new vinyl reissue—to create an analog master that didn’t have a single digital stage. But it was only one part. From there, Shields had to find a disc-cutting apparatus that didn’t have a digital process, a rarity in the current landscape. Finding the right facility and making sure its sound was up to snuff turned out to be another expensive and time-consuming proposition.

(...)

It’s also clear that sound itself is a holy thing for Shields. He speaks of it in almost mystical terms, the way a certain kind of circuitry can alter the texture in tiny ways that, he feels, can have an overwhelming impact. In his world, every piece of equipment has a role to play in the final product of a piece of recorded music, and each changes the final product in a way that can be expressed emotionally. In creating the all-analog version of Loveless, he’s not trying to create something that “sounds better,” but rather to create a new way of experiencing Loveless that honors the spirit of the original while inevitably imparting its own subtly different character.

Kevin Shields:

"Traditionally with analog tapes, if you want to edit something together, you’ve got to basically find the spot by rocking the tape back and forth and splicing it and sticking the two pieces of tape together. But the crossfades that we had on Loveless were technically impossible to do in the analog domain because a lot of them were very short, yet way too long to actually recreate with normal editing techniques.

So, to get the things fading between themselves in that seamless way that they did in the digital domain, we had to figure out new ways of doing edits. We couldn’t use an edit block, which is this metal thing with various angles on it, because the edit block positions weren’t anywhere near what we needed to achieve. So we were actually building our own edit blocks. We had an engineer called Andy Savours who basically spent a year of his life working out these mathematical formulas and measurements on how to do this. Eventually, things started to work."
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby Sprague Dawley on Wed Nov 08, 2017 9:00 pm

i love loveless but man thats a lot of anal cuntery for somethign that sounds like someone sitting on a keyboard underwater
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby travis k on Wed Nov 08, 2017 11:08 pm

Andy Savours is either bored or from a wealthy family or a big fan.
Or all three of those things.
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby Thanasis on Thu Nov 09, 2017 3:01 am

Bernardo wrote:
enframed wrote:
Thanasis wrote:
Bernardo wrote:this goes here, I think

http://pitchfork.com/features/interview ... new-album/


Yeah. How much better is it really gonna sound? And I bet it's going to be expensive too. I'll pass.


Jesus, another one.


I thought this bordered on disturbing:

Creating the vinyl master of Loveless turned out to be another multi-year project beset by financial and technical difficulties. First, Shields needed money for studio time and to pay engineers, cash that didn’t come through until the band toured two years ago.

But funding turned out to be the easy part. To do a version of Loveless entirely in the analog domain is a tricky thing, because back in 1991, when the record was mastered for CD, LP, and cassette, digital methods were used in its final editing and mastering stages. Loveless is defined by its sequencing and flow, and the brief transitions and interludes between tracks are part of what makes the album special. Those transitions were created at least in part using computers, so to re-create them using purely analog technology meant going back to the original tapes and reconstructing them by hand using tape splices.

That was part of Shields’ task for the new vinyl reissue—to create an analog master that didn’t have a single digital stage. But it was only one part. From there, Shields had to find a disc-cutting apparatus that didn’t have a digital process, a rarity in the current landscape. Finding the right facility and making sure its sound was up to snuff turned out to be another expensive and time-consuming proposition.

(...)

It’s also clear that sound itself is a holy thing for Shields. He speaks of it in almost mystical terms, the way a certain kind of circuitry can alter the texture in tiny ways that, he feels, can have an overwhelming impact. In his world, every piece of equipment has a role to play in the final product of a piece of recorded music, and each changes the final product in a way that can be expressed emotionally. In creating the all-analog version of Loveless, he’s not trying to create something that “sounds better,” but rather to create a new way of experiencing Loveless that honors the spirit of the original while inevitably imparting its own subtly different character.

Kevin Shields:

"Traditionally with analog tapes, if you want to edit something together, you’ve got to basically find the spot by rocking the tape back and forth and splicing it and sticking the two pieces of tape together. But the crossfades that we had on Loveless were technically impossible to do in the analog domain because a lot of them were very short, yet way too long to actually recreate with normal editing techniques.

So, to get the things fading between themselves in that seamless way that they did in the digital domain, we had to figure out new ways of doing edits. We couldn’t use an edit block, which is this metal thing with various angles on it, because the edit block positions weren’t anywhere near what we needed to achieve. So we were actually building our own edit blocks. We had an engineer called Andy Savours who basically spent a year of his life working out these mathematical formulas and measurements on how to do this. Eventually, things started to work."



...and all to be completely undone by a hamfisted pressing plant that doesn't give a shit.
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby rappard on Thu Nov 09, 2017 5:33 am

Andy Savours (Facebook post, November 1) wrote:Over the last year or two (maybe more) I've been working with Kevin Shields from My Bloody Valentine on a vinyl remaster of their album Loveless. Here Kevin talks about what turned out to be a highly unusual process; delving deep into the hidden mysteries of the record and trying to tame the tiger that is analog. Reports that I spent a whole year doing sums to calculate crossfades may be slightly exaggerated. However, if you need someone to do origami style edits on your priceless master tapes I'm your guy. I just ask that you leave the room first so you can't see my hands shaking.

Making this new version was a long process but despite having listened to every track on Loveless thousands of times I never got bored of it. A sign of true genius.
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby joseghast on Mon Nov 20, 2017 10:07 am

Sprague Dawley wrote:i love loveless but man thats a lot of anal cuntery for somethign that sounds like someone sitting on a keyboard underwater


This made me laugh loud, especially after working for 4 years with a band that worshipped that album and Shields.
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby the finger genius on Wed Dec 13, 2017 6:03 am

Looks like someone's got a new product line:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Pleiades-V4-ve ... 2448272096
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Re: Stereo Times reviewer holding my $80k cables for ransom

Postby andyman on Wed Dec 13, 2017 8:49 am

Was it Billy Corgan's?
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