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Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking on

Postby steve on Sun Jul 19, 2015 1:00 pm

The idea is to get FM NewDarkAge started in his learning to cook with simple recipes. Stuff with few ingredients that isn't sensitive to imprecise measurements, temperatures or techniques. Like this, a dish with two ingredients that can teach a lot of things about cooking.:

Potatoes in cream gratin
Needs: Potatoes, cream, salt, pepper, baking dish or casserole (can use a deep skillet)

Peel and slice a potato thinly and arrange in a baking dish or casserole in an overlapping layer. Season generously with salt and pepper and repeat in overlapping layers until the baking dish or casserole is filled with potatoes, leaving about 1/4" of free space. You do it one potato at a time, seasoning as you go because you won't know how many potatoes will fill the dish until you do it, and that way you don't waste any potatoes.

Pour cream into the baking dish until the potatoes are almost submerged and move freely in the liquid, still leaving about 1/4" of free space. You can use milk, cream or half-and-half, all are good. The only difference is the amount of richness. Note how loose and liquid the dish is. Carefully place the dish in an oven set to 350-400F. This is easier if you put the dish on a baking sheet and then slide the sheet into the oven, and the sheet will protect the oven in case the cream bubbles over or splashes out of the dish. If the oven is pre-heated it will shave some time off the cooking process, but it isn't absolutely necessary.

After 20-30 minutes, inspect the gratin. It should be bubbly but not browned. Check every 20 minutes until the top of the potatoes and cream are browned to an attractive degree, then remove from the oven and let cool until serving temperature (warm, not boiling hot).

Note how the starch from the potatoes has infused into the cream and thickened into a lovely sauce. This starch-thickening principle is used in many classic hot sauces, puddings and pie fillings. Note how the starch and sugars in the potatoes and the milk protein have browned where exposed directly to heat; this is caramelization. Caramelization changes simple molecules into complex, aromatic ones and is one of the cornerstones of good eating. Note how the seasoning enriches all the flavors; you should not taste "pepper" or "salt," just a broadening of the existing flavors. This is the purpose of seasoning.

You can make this same dish more complex by adding grated cheese at the beginning or end, garnishing with chives or parsley, or adding rosemary, bacon, garlic or onions to the initial gratin, but I think the simple version is delicious.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby eephour on Sun Jul 19, 2015 3:17 pm

This thread rules.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby steve on Sun Jul 19, 2015 3:24 pm

Here's a technique good for any cruciferous vegetable (cabbage, kale, brussel sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, chards, endive).

You will need: Skillet, butter plus olive oil (or sunflower or canola oil), one of those vegetables, garlic, salt, pepper, some lemon juice or vinegar.

Cut the vegetable into bite-size pieces. If it's broccoli, you can peel the stem and chop it as well as using the florets. Wash the vegetable in copious water and drain in a colander. Get used to washing vegetables, it's a critical part of cooking.

While the vegetable is draining, melt some butter with an equal amount of olive oil (or other vegetable oil) in a skillet over medium-high heat. For a liter of vegetables you'd need about two tablespoons of each. Slice or chop a couple of cloves of garlic very finely and add to the oil and butter. When it just starts to color, but before it browns or smokes, add the chopped vegetable. It will spatter a little, but don't be alarmed. If you overwhelm the pan with all the vegetable at once it will spatter less than if you are skittish and drop in a few pieces at a time. Using tongs, a large spoon or by tossing in the pan, turn the vegetable so it is coated in the oil and garlic. Once coated, season generously with salt and pepper.

Keep the heat medium or high and turn/toss the vegetables often until they begin to brown slightly at the edges and the browning is pretty uniform -- almost all the pieces have at least a little browning. Take the pan off the heat, and splash the vegetable with some vinegar or lemon juice (about the same amount as the oil used at the beginning). Turn the vegetable so it is dressed uniformly.

You can eat them like this or garnish with a drizzle of honey, some sliced almonds or grated sharp cheese. You can serve them hot as a side dish or at room temperature as a salad.

Things to notice: Since you're cooking with high heat, the vegetable isn't in the pan for a long time, so the center of it will not be overcooked and mushy. If you use a lower heat, you cook for a longer time and the vegetable will get more tender, sometimes to the point of mushiness. You can use this principle to create the kind of texture you want -- quick cooking on high heat for firm vegetables with some caramelization (and associated sharp flavors), long low cooking for a tender, more mellow result. You can compare broccoli prepared this way to broccoli boiled for soup to see the difference.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby NewDarkAge on Sun Jul 19, 2015 3:52 pm

Thank you so much! This is so great!
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby newberry on Sun Jul 19, 2015 5:11 pm

I'm a terrible cook, but I've found lentil soup is easy (not to mention healthy, tasty, and inexpensive).

Here are a few sources I started with, and it's easy to wing it once you've followed a recipe.


Red lentil, chickpea & chilli soup

7 Ways To Make Lentil Soup (Mark Bittman)
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby steve on Sun Jul 19, 2015 5:56 pm

This is a delicious broccoli soup that couldn't be simpler. It is one of the rare vegan dishes that can be described as both rich and delicious.

You will need a pot of salted water, a blender, stick blender or mortar and pestle, broccoli, black pepper, a little olive oil and a clove of garlic.

Clean and cut up the broccoli as described for the saute above. Bring a pot of water to a strong boil, then add salt until the water tastes slightly salty, usually about a teaspoon per liter. When boiling vegetables you often salt the water more than this, until it is as strong as sea water, because you're removing the vegetables and not using the water. For this soup we're going to use the water to thin the soup, so you need less salt.

Add the broccoli pieces to the water and boil. The water should just barely cover the broccoli. If you have too much water, pour some out at the beginning. Boil the broccoli pieces until very tender, about 10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon or wire basket, remove the broccoli from the water into the jar of a blender. Do not throw out the cooking water.

Add about an equal amount of the hot cooking water to the blender jar as you have broccoli, plus one roughly-chopped clove of garlic, then pulse the blender until the broccoli is mixed up pretty well. If it clumps, add more of the cooking water. Once it's moving smoothly, run the blender on high to emulsify the broccoli into a smooth creamy soup. As it is running or stopping it briefly, add some black pepper and a couple of tablespoons of olive oil, then continue blending until the soup is smooth as fuck. Taste the soup once in a while and decide if it needs more salt for flavor, more pepper for spiciness, more olive oil for richness, or if it's fucking delicious already. Stop when it's delicious and serve.

If you don't have a blender (or food processor) you can use a stick blender with the soup in a large bowl. If you don't have a stick blender, you can mash the broccoli and garlic into a paste in a mortar and pestle, then dilute with the cooking water and whisk to combine.

Pour the soup into bowls. The soup is delicious like this, but you can garnish the soup with a pat of butter, a tablespoon of heavy cream, creme fraiche or yogurt, some grated cheese or chopped nuts. I like pistachios with this soup because the colors look nice together.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby Ben Abraham on Sun Jul 19, 2015 6:38 pm

Ox-Tail stew according to Jamie Oliver. Regardless of how you feel about Jamie Oliver as a person/celebrity/whatever, this recipe is delicious. Especially in the winter, Ox-Tail stew and some nice fresh Sourdough break is amazing. It's really easy to make and will last a week. It's a little time consuming though so it's probably best to do it on a weekend.

2.5 kg oxtail, chopped into 4cm chunks (ask your butcher to do this)
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
olive oil
2 medium leeks
2 stalks of celery
4 medium carrots
a few sprigs of fresh thyme
a few sprigs of fresh rosemary
4 fresh bay leaves
4 cloves
2 heaped tablespoons plain flour
2 x 400 g tins of plum tomatoes
275 ml porter or red wine
Optional:
1 litre organic beef stock
Worcestershire sauce

Preheat the oven to 220ºC/425ºF/gas 7. Place a large roasting tray in the oven to preheat.

Carefully remove the hot tray from the oven, then add the oxtail. Season and drizzle over a lug of olive oil, then toss to coat and place in the hot oven for around 20 minutes, or until golden and caramelized.

Meanwhile, trim and halve the leeks and celery lengthways, then chop into rough 2cm chunks. Peel and chop the carrots into 2cm pieces, then place into a large ovenproof casserole pan over a medium-low heat with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Pick, roughly chop and add the thyme and rosemary leaves, then add the bay and cook for around 20 minutes, or until soft and sweet, stirring frequently.

Meanwhile, remove the oxtail from the oven and set aside. Reduce the oven temperature to 170ºC/325ºF/gas 3.

Add the cloves and flour to the veg, stirring well to combine, then pour in the tomatoes and porter (or wine, if using). Add the oxtail and any roasting juices, cover with the beef stock or 1 litre of cold water and stir well. Turn the heat up to high and bring to the boil, then pop the lid on and place in the hot oven for around 5 hours, or until the meat falls away from the bone, stirring every hour or so and adding a splash of water to loosen, if needed.

Remove the pan from the oven and leave to cool for about 10 minutes. Using rubber gloves, strip the meat from the bones and return to the pan, discarding the bones. Add a good splash of Worcestershire sauce, season to taste and enjoy with creamy mash and seasonal steamed greens.

Tip: Turn this stew into soup by adding a good splash of boiling water and simmering to your desired consistency. I also love this stirred through pappardelle and served with a grating of Parmesan on top – incredible!

Read more at http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/beef ... s3BCQQB.99
Last edited by Ben Abraham on Sun Jul 19, 2015 10:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby mr.arrison on Sun Jul 19, 2015 9:00 pm

Sardine & Avocado Toast

Get a really nice loaf of sourdough. Slice it thin.
Open a can of Sardines. Any kind will do.. The smoked kind in Olive Oil are great.
Drain the oil slightly.
Pour the Sardines into a bowl, mash with a bit of lemon juice, black pepper and salt to taste.
If you have Garlic, add in a tiny amount, very finely chopped.
Grate some of the lemon peel (zest) into the fish bowl.

> Toast the sourdough.
While it's toasting, cut the avocado in half, remove the pit and spoon it out.
> Mash the avocado into the toast, add some salt and pepper and a squeeze of the remaining lemon.
> Apply the sardine mixture on top.
Consume.

---

And if you have an heirloom tomato, slice it and place between the avocado and the fish.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby ERawk on Sun Jul 19, 2015 10:25 pm

http://www.convert-me.com/en/convert/cooking/

Since this is a US/rest of the world joint effort, we should have a converter for reference.

If I have time, I'll post the JOC recipe I use for veggie stock; this will enable you to make a variety of soups (potato leek, squashes, other vegetarian oriented soups...). I also will freeze a quart per portion for preservation/future use.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby Tommy Alpha on Mon Jul 20, 2015 1:50 am

Broccoli lemon pasta.

Needs- a broccoli, a lemon, salt. Can also have garlic, sunflower seeds/pine nuts.

Chop broccoli into edible sized florets- its not important, how big or small really. Cook pasta (the longest part of the cooking). When the pasta is ready, drain it and leave it. Bit of oil so it doesn't clag.

Next, pour some oil into pan, put some salt in it- just a sprinkle. Put the lid on and whack the heat up.
Check it- when the oil is smoking, it's ready. Throw the broccoli in, put the lid on and shake the bastard. I mean press the lid down and take the handle and really shake that motherfucker hard like an angry British au pair for like a minute. Don't worry about it being on the heat, the oil will be hot enough in its own. It should be really green and covered in the oil when you are done. Should be cruchy, but you can't under cook it so don't worry. Mix it with the pasta, squeeze half a lemon over it, salt to taste.

Try it a couple times, after you get confident with it, you can try things like chucking in chunks of garlic or sunflower seeds to the oil a few seconds before the broccoli. Olives after or raw cherry tomatoes. It's a good dish to experiment with once you have it down and mess around with flavour combinations, that kind of thing.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby chris jury on Mon Jul 20, 2015 2:00 am

I learned a very simple version of Coq au Vin that has held me in good stead and is impossible to fuck up.

-Cheap dark meat chicken
-handful of root vegetables
-Bottle of cheap red wine
-can of tomato sauce
-chicken broth/bullion

If you have a dutch oven, use it, if not start with a skillet- Brown the chicken (I usually wait until there is a sale on drumsticks) with some oil. When brown either wipe out the DO or transfer to an oven-worthy pan. Toss in chopped root veggies (whatever is about to go bad -usually potato, carrot, parsnip, etc), the chicken and the liquid. You want liquid to about 3/4 cover the chicken...so just eyeball the amounts. I usually make about 2 pounds of chicken (leftovers!)- so I use a tiny can of tomato sauce, about 2 cups of broth and 1/2 of a $3 bottle Shiraz or Bordeaux. 250 degree F oven for about 2 hours. Make some egg noodles, put a piece of chicken and some veggies on top of it.

Variations on this braising liquid also work great w/ flanken style ribs, pork shoulder, or pot roast.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby AnthonyVillalobos on Mon Jul 20, 2015 2:22 am

steve wrote:This is a delicious broccoli soup that couldn't be simpler. It is one of the rare vegan dishes that can be described as both rich and delicious.

You will need a pot of salted water, a blender, stick blender or mortar and pestle, broccoli, black pepper, a little olive oil and a clove of garlic.

Clean and cut up the broccoli as described for the saute above. Bring a pot of water to a strong boil, then add salt until the water tastes slightly salty, usually about a teaspoon per liter. When boiling vegetables you often salt the water more than this, until it is as strong as sea water, because you're removing the vegetables and not using the water. For this soup we're going to use the water to thin the soup, so you need less salt.

Add the broccoli pieces to the water and boil. The water should just barely cover the broccoli. If you have too much water, pour some out at the beginning. Boil the broccoli pieces until very tender, about 10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon or wire basket, remove the broccoli from the water into the jar of a blender. Do not throw out the cooking water.

Add about an equal amount of the hot cooking water to the blender jar as you have broccoli, plus one roughly-chopped clove of garlic, then pulse the blender until the broccoli is mixed up pretty well. If it clumps, add more of the cooking water. Once it's moving smoothly, run the blender on high to emulsify the broccoli into a smooth creamy soup. As it is running or stopping it briefly, add some black pepper and a couple of tablespoons of olive oil, then continue blending until the soup is smooth as fuck. Taste the soup once in a while and decide if it needs more salt for flavor, more pepper for spiciness, more olive oil for richness, or if it's fucking delicious already. Stop when it's delicious and serve.

If you don't have a blender (or food processor) you can use a stick blender with the soup in a large bowl. If you don't have a stick blender, you can mash the broccoli and garlic into a paste in a mortar and pestle, then dilute with the cooking water and whisk to combine.

Pour the soup into bowls. The soup is delicious like this, but you can garnish the soup with a pat of butter, a tablespoon of heavy cream, creme fraiche or yogurt, some grated cheese or chopped nuts. I like pistachios with this soup because the colors look nice together.



Gonna bust this one out for dinner tomorrow.

Cheers!
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby Tommy Alpha on Mon Jul 20, 2015 2:45 am

A classic from my grandad- Green Bean and Almond soup. Total comfort food.

You'll need- butter, flaked almonds, green beans, veg stock. I'm not putting amount because it's good to get used to judging by eye and taste. Plus you can never make too much if you have a freezer.

Take a chunk of butter and melt it in a deep pot. It's important to keep the heat on low for butter because it can burn easily. When it starts to bubble throw a handful of flaked almonds in and stir. Wait til they start to brown. Then throw in your green beans (which you have washed, topped and tailed and cut in half if you like). Don't let these brown, just stir them round for a couple minutes. Then put your stock in. A pint probably, but judge by eye- you can always add water. Bring it to boil once and then reduce heat right down. Cook for half an hour- an hour. You want the beans to have a bit of crunch so keep trying and again use your judgement. There's little to mess up, but don't worry if you do because that's how you learn.

Serve with a lovely bit of buttered toast.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby Nico Adie on Mon Jul 20, 2015 2:51 am

I've posted this recipe before, but it's one of my favourites. For when one wants to push one's boat out:

Peposo

Serves 6-8.

2.5kg beef shin.
20 cloves garlic.
Lots of rosemary sprigs.
2 heaped tablespoons finely ground black pepper (approx. 30 grams worth).
Salt.
1-2 bottles decent Italian wine. I like Chianti in this.
Decent olive oil.

Get a big casserole dish.

Put a layer of beef shin on the bottom, cover it with pepper, sprinkle some salt on there, place a few sprigs of rosemary, drizzle with olive oil, add 4-6 cloves of garlic (peeled, unchopped).

Repeat this until you have no beef shin left to layer.

Pour wine over until the beef is completely covered. You can drink whatever's left.

Put a lid on the dish, or cover with tinfoil if you don't have a lid.

Cook for around 8 hours at 120C.

Eat with big slices of ciabatta drizzled with olive oil and rubbed with garlic.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby Rodabod on Mon Jul 20, 2015 2:58 am

Nico, that sounds ace. Kind of like a Bourguignon without the marinating. Important to stick with the coarse beef like shin. I've seen people try stews like these with supermarket "casserole beef" which turns to mush.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby simmo on Mon Jul 20, 2015 4:23 am

Shakshuka. It might seem complicated because there's a fair few ingredients in there, but it really is quite easy and takes about 30 minutes. It's light on equipment and cheap to make, so good Uni food. Plus it is one of the most delicious things on earth.

To feed two, you need:

A large, shallow pan - with a lid if possible, if not you can cover with tin foil

Plenty of mild oil - light olive or vegetable
4 eggs
2 red, 1 yellow bell pepper
1 tin of good quality tomatoes (I'd recommend Cirio brand as easiest to find in UK)
2tsp of brown sugar
2 bay leaves
4 sprigs of thyme
1 or 2fresh chillis, finely chopped (depending on how hot they are and how you like it)
1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 heaped teaspoon of ground coriander
salt, pepper
Water, as required
Fresh coriander and/or parsley to garnish
Feta and/or yoghurt to garnish

1. Peel and halve your onion from top to bottom. Slice widthways in to strips about 0.5cm wide.
2. Core your peppers and remove all the seeds. Cut in to strips about 1cm wide.
3. Pick the leaves from your thyme sprigs; do this by holding the top of the sprig, pinching your thumb and forefinger around the sprig with your other hand, and then running your hand down, thus removing the leaves.
4. Place the pan on a medium heat. Heat your oil. Be generous. Make sure that the pan is well coated and a couple of mm deep.
5. Add the onions. Stir regularly to avoid burning. Cook them for around 3 mins or until golden but not burnt.
6. Add the peppers, cumin seeds, chilli, bay leaves, brown sugar and thyme. Continue to fry for around 5 minutes or until the peppers have softened and seem cooked. Don't be afraid to reduce the heat if it looks like things might burn.
7. Add the coriander powder, fry for one or two minutes to toast the spices.
8. Add the tin of tomatoes and season generously. You need a decent amount of salt to counteract the sweetness of the sauce.
9. You're looking for a reasonably liquid sauce, like a typical pasta sauce I guess. You may well need to add some water.
10. Use a spoon or spatula to make four little pockets in your sauce. Break the eggs directly in to them.
11. Cover your dish with the lid, if it has one. If not, you can just cover it with tin foil.
12. Cook for around five minutes, until the eggs have poached. The whites should be solid, but the yolks still runny.
13. Remove the lid and garnish with chopped coriander and/or parsley. Add a bit of yoghurt and/or feta too, if you like, for maximum deliciousness.

Dish it up or just eat it direct from the pan with some crusty white bread to dip in the sauce. Or some pitta bread would work. Or I've even done it with couscous.

As I said, it sounds complicated but it's really not. Once you have the hang of it it takes about half an hour from start to finish, and is just so damn tasty.

Ottolenghi recipe (which I have streamlined a touch) here.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby Tommy Alpha on Mon Jul 20, 2015 4:48 am

Ben Abraham wrote:Ox-Tail stew according to Jamie Oliver. Regardless of how you feel about Jamie Oliver as a person/celebrity/whatever, this recipe is delicious. Especially in the winter, Ox-Tail stew and some nice fresh Sourdough break is amazing. It's really easy to make and will last a week. It's a little time consuming though so it's probably best to do it on a weekend.

2.5 kg oxtail, chopped into 4cm chunks (ask your butcher to do this)
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
olive oil
2 medium leeks
2 stalks of celery
4 medium carrots
a few sprigs of fresh thyme
a few sprigs of fresh rosemary
4 fresh bay leaves
4 cloves
2 heaped tablespoons plain flour
2 x 400 g tins of plum tomatoes
275 ml porter or red wine
Optional:
1 litre organic beef stock
Worcestershire sauce

Preheat the oven to 220ºC/425ºF/gas 7. Place a large roasting tray in the oven to preheat.

Carefully remove the hot tray from the oven, then add the oxtail. Season and drizzle over a lug of olive oil, then toss to coat and place in the hot oven for around 20 minutes, or until golden and caramelized.

Meanwhile, trim and halve the leeks and celery lengthways, then chop into rough 2cm chunks. Peel and chop the carrots into 2cm pieces, then place into a large ovenproof casserole pan over a medium-low heat with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Pick, roughly chop and add the thyme and rosemary leaves, then add the bay and cook for around 20 minutes, or until soft and sweet, stirring frequently.

Meanwhile, remove the oxtail from the oven and set aside. Reduce the oven temperature to 170ºC/325ºF/gas 3.

Add the cloves and flour to the veg, stirring well to combine, then pour in the tomatoes and porter (or wine, if using). Add the oxtail and any roasting juices, cover with the beef stock or 1 litre of cold water and stir well. Turn the heat up to high and bring to the boil, then pop the lid on and place in the hot oven for around 5 hours, or until the meat falls away from the bone, stirring every hour or so and adding a splash of water to loosen, if needed.

Remove the pan from the oven and leave to cool for about 10 minutes. Using rubber gloves, strip the meat from the bones and return to the pan, discarding the bones. Add a good splash of Worcestershire sauce, season to taste and enjoy with creamy mash and seasonal steamed greens.

Tip: Turn this stew into soup by adding a good splash of boiling water and simmering to your desired consistency. I also love this stirred through pappardelle and served with a grating of Parmesan on top – incredible!

Read more at http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/beef ... s3BCQQB.99


This looks like a great recipe, but I think you might be trying to get the lad sprinting a bit early.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby sundistortion on Mon Jul 20, 2015 7:38 am

In the interest of keeping things facile and simple, this is how I roast potatoes.

Hoping its intelligible:

Take whatever amount of potatoes (Yukon Gold and Russets are common for roasts but it doesn't really matter, experiment with different types to discern what you like and don't like about each kind)

Skin them, don't worry about precision. Its best to then chop them into pieces slightly larger than a golfball.

Cover them in a pot with boiling water and make sure the water is heavily salted. As in use more than you think is necessary.

When they have softened slightly (but are still firm) drain the water into a colander and make sure to jiggle them around to rough up the edges, this will create more of a crusty skin in the oven.

Transfer the potatoes into an oven dish or tray and roll them around in olive oil or butter (or both). If there is a millimetre or two of oil/butter on the bottom of the tray this is beneficial.

Feel free to add:

rosemary, or any other herb but rosemary/thyme are favourites for me. People like to add them in the last 10 minutes of the cook so they don't burn, but fuck that. They are still good all gnarled.

Garlic, use whole garlic just smashed with your palm into the table. Also add peeled garlic too, and make sure to eat it

salt and pepper


You can also use other seasonings like cayenne pepper, chilli seeds/flakes et al.

Oven: 180-200 degrees 40-60mins

Just watch them and don't wait for a certain time limit to pass, you know how you like potatoes so just keep an eye on it.


Tips:

Heavily salt the water the potatoes boil in. It enhances the flavour dramatically. Try unsalted water and then roasting potatoes with salted water and you will know the difference. They also have a better colour and are more crispy from heavily salted water. I think it has something to do with starch interacting with the sodium and being drawn out.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby jimmy two hands on Mon Jul 20, 2015 8:34 am

steve wrote:This is a delicious broccoli soup that couldn't be simpler.


We make a similar broccoli soup that has potatoes in it as well - you can substitute cubed potatoes for anywhere from a quarter to a half of the broccoli and follow the same instructions. For the potatoes, cut the cubes to about the same size as the broccoli stem pieces. Also very good with cheese and/or croutons on top.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby bumble on Mon Jul 20, 2015 8:49 am

Pretty error-proof, and after making it once, you've got it DOWN.

Italian Sausage and Chard White Bean Soup

Garlic - 2 cloves, crushed
Onions (small) - 1, diced
Chard - 1 bunch, leaves torn and stems chopped into 1/2" pieces
Mushrooms, brown - 1/2 lb, sliced
Diced tomatoes (14 oz / 397 g can) - 1 can, drained
White beans (14 oz / 397 g can) - 1 can, rinsed and drained
Cooking oil - 1 Tbsp
Italian sausage (uncooked) - 1/2 lb (Pick your favorite. We chose a hot Italian sausage from the meat counter)
Chicken stock - 2 1/2 cups
Bay leaf - 1
Oregano, dried - 1/2 tsp
Parmesan (opt) - for serving

Heat a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add cooking oil and then Italian sausage (removed from its casing) to heated oil. Saute until sausage is golden, 4 to 6 minutes.

Add garlic, onions, chopped chard stems, and mushrooms to pot. Saute for ~3 minutes and then add in tomatoes, chicken stock, bay leaf, and oregano. Cover and bring to a boil.

Add in beans and chard leaves. Cook for another 5 minutes and then season to taste with salt and pepper.

Remove bay leaf before spooning into individual bowls and top with parmesan.
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