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buzz and hum from electric guitars and basses..

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buzz and hum from electric guitars and basses..

Postby Pigeon on Sun Apr 23, 2017 11:54 pm

I've been getting a lot more hum (60 cycle I think) from guitars and basses. I don't know if anything was done recently by the electric company to whatever is supplying our building but it's been getting really annoying. How does EA clean up the power? Any suggestions? Sometimes the musicians orient their instruments in a position that lessens it but doesn't seem to completely remedy it.

Thanks,
Eddie
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Re: buzz and hum from electric guitars and basses..

Postby the finger genius on Mon Apr 24, 2017 9:44 am

tech room bub.

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Re: buzz and hum from electric guitars and basses..

Postby tmoneygetpaid on Fri May 05, 2017 4:48 pm

Well, the studio has a giant mains isolation transformer. But if you are getting hum that changes with position, and you don't hear it when the guitar isn't plugged into the amp, my understanding is that's likely your guitar picking up some EM interference. Could be light dimmers, the power transformer on your amp's magnetic field, etc. You can try shielding your guitar better, getting humbuckers, moving away from your amp.

Are there dimmers in the building? Were there some installed recently?

People (myself included) often blindly try a couple things whenever there is a noise issue: lifting the safety ground on the amp, consolidating equipment onto one outlet/ circuit, or using an isolation transformer, but those only help remedy a ground loop. Doesn't sound like that's what's happening.
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Re: buzz and hum from electric guitars and basses..

Postby Pigeon on Wed Oct 25, 2017 4:20 pm

tmoneygetpaid wrote:Well, the studio has a giant mains isolation transformer. But if you are getting hum that changes with position, and you don't hear it when the guitar isn't plugged into the amp, my understanding is that's likely your guitar picking up some EM interference. Could be light dimmers, the power transformer on your amp's magnetic field, etc. You can try shielding your guitar better, getting humbuckers, moving away from your amp.

Are there dimmers in the building? Were there some installed recently?

People (myself included) often blindly try a couple things whenever there is a noise issue: lifting the safety ground on the amp, consolidating equipment onto one outlet/ circuit, or using an isolation transformer, but those only help remedy a ground loop. Doesn't sound like that's what's happening.


Thanks, Taylor. Well, we finally figured out what is going on. Luckily, my cousin recently became a journeyman electrician and he came to check out my building. It turns out our unit isn't properly grounded. There's no grounding buss in the junction box even though outside there is a grounding pole with a few conduits that seem to have grounding cables attached. So even though our outlets have ground wires those wires are not attached to any ground at the box inside.
Luckily he's can get it taken care of, I just need a pocket of time where I can have the studio down for a few days.

I'm hoping that takes care of our issues....

Best,
Eddie
"I raged against the machine and all this money came out of it!" -Bart Simpson
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