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Let us see your bike.

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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby seaux on Sat Apr 25, 2015 6:45 pm

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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby emmanuelle cunt on Sun Apr 26, 2015 1:58 am

bumble wrote:
Ummm...how can you tell how fast a bike will be?

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/city_bikes.htm




Bikes are obviously as fast as whoever is driving them, but generally speaking the more aerodynamic position you have, the faster you will ride and aerodynamic position means having handlebars really, really. Second (or third, including rider) would be the tires - the skinnier and slicker it gets the faster it is (edit: this is BS. Actually, a wider tire has lower rolling resistance than it's thinner version, assuming the pressure is the same), so a 23mm totally slick tire is really fast but I don't think it's the best choice for varying a kid ot the back as in my experience heavier load makes mike the bike wobbly so a thicker tire is preferred. I'd look at hybrid/gravel bikes - 700c wheels with ~38mm wide tires, I think all of them are equipped with mountings for racks and mud guards. Adjustable stems are a good thing if you're not sure which riding position suits you the best too.
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby Rodabod on Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:28 am

More modern thinking actually suggests that very narrow tyres actually lead to more rolling resistance. It obviously depends on the road surface, but TDF riders are often riding 25mm tyres now. It's not something that I've tested myself, but I think Continental published a study not that long ago. I run 28mm Grand Prix tyres for commuting / fun now.

This could easily go into a long (boring) technical discussion, but your contact patch will remain the same amount of area for a given tyre pressure. Your resistance is largely built from tyre deformation as it changes shape over the contact patch.

Anyway, things that I have noticed make an immediate change to how fast a bike feels:

Light and supple tyres.
Light wheels.
Total combined weight of rider plus bike and panniers, etc.

Aerodynamics (so, riding position) become more important as you approach faster speeds as the total resistance against you becomes dominated by wind resistance.
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby JunkieSeahorse on Sun Apr 26, 2015 9:02 am

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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby Josef K on Sun Apr 26, 2015 4:40 pm

The reality of riding a bike during Scottish springtime. Rain, hail and shine today and a very dirty puncture repair.


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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby bumble on Fri May 08, 2015 8:48 am

Thank you for the advice to go to a bike shop. It is how I met my new best friend, Lucille.

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She is a Giant Alight 1.

The iBert baby seat works on Lucille, when it didn't work on my old lame cruiser.

Bike commute #1: ACCOMPLISHED.
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby bishopdante on Tue May 19, 2015 3:15 pm

I had to take one of them off the road and do a down-to-parts rebuild, because I was involved in a traffic incident.

I'm not saying it was my fault, but I have modified my riding style and I simply won't be doing that one again.

So the problem was... the street lights were out. Black painted victorian houses with dense trees. Dark & Rainy, beginning of rush hour. Couple of very shady looking fully-tinted Mercedes SUVs parked up. Motorbike pizza delivery guy pulls away fast in front of me, look round, two buses coming up behind at the junction, we have a bottleneck on the road formed by the parked cars, one of the buses will stop but the other will need to overtake. Bet you they'll cut me up.

Ok no probs, just buzz past these tinted-out parked SUVs no probs, up a few gears and then comfy next to the kerb with both lanes unobstructed.

As I pass the rear wing of the first SUV with about 5ft of clearance, ready to turn in towards the kerb, very black unlit road in front of me, it's like somebody hit the front wheel with a baseball bat, bike is gone and I'm flying upside down with barrel roll tarmac "oh dear, this appears to be a heavy bail today... what the *fuck* just happened." Hit the tarmac pretty hard, would prefer to just stay down and have a bit of a roll around, but those buses are coming... where the hell did the bike go... what the hell did I just hit?! I'm looking around tangled up upside down, unable to see anything that could have done that to me, it's eerily quiet, and nothing but the bike, glinting slightly in a mangled shape. That's crazy. No way was that a mechanical seizure on the bike. That was something heavy, and it hit me as much as I hit it. What the hell. Never had anything like it! The mysterious invisible wall?! What... the... I can stop in like 6ft with these brakes... and the last 3ft of that aren't violent speeds... how the hell am I running into stuff?! Give me a chance to pull the lever at least! Damn. Ow the leg. Oh now I can see through my trousers, there are a number of large gaping holes, how handy. Well it's not too bad as serious road rashes go.

Picking myself up, the bike is a good 15 foot away from me in the middle of the road, so I run towards it to retrieve it. Against the reflected street lights from down the road, I can make out something... what on earth could it be?! It looks like a handbag, black leather or something, and it's sitting on the floor, a sort of baggy 18 inches cubed, 2 feet out from the wheel arch of the last mercedes SUV, just plonked there, not moving at all. What the hell?! Am I going mental? That wasn't there, I'd have seen it against the sheen of the tarmac. No way was that there when I rode up.

Chuck the bike into the kerb quickly... won't even wheel, has to be lobbed. Holy shit that's a dread amount of damage, cork grip smashed off, written off bent / cracked handlebars, brake lever smashed in half & leaking oil, mech has disappeared into the back wheel and eaten a few spokes... chain all munched up into the back wheel & dropout ripped right off the frame. What the hell?! No way does a handbag do that. WTF is in there... concrete blocks?!

I run up to the suspicious object, and the object has a pair of boots poking out of the bottom of it, it's like a large square bag made out of some sort of puffer jacket material, jet black, except it's got feet like a fox-fur, small black leather boots?

I open up the flap of this bag, and discover the reason for the boots. There is a tiny face inside, wincing in excruciating pain. Horrific injury to the left temple, a gouge out of her head the size of a pound coin and a 50p put together, like she'd had a concrete block dropped on her head from two storeys up. Oh dear oh dear what have we here. She can't move, totally winded also. How on earth did she appear, she must have come from between the pair of SUVs, a tiny gap of a foot! Really? But I gave them a proper suspicious look... these mercs are only 5ft at the roof line... I'm sure I looked. What the hell. Well... maybe didn't look properly. What the hell I remember it, even tried to look through the tinted black glass on the way in and had a scope over the roof. What the hell? Was she tying her laces in the middle of the road?!

Wave the buses around & stand over the winded lady, almost invisible in the road, and quickly explain to her that she's just been in an accident, I've got about as much of an idea as she has about how it might have happened, but she is currently in the middle of the road imminently about to be run over, and that relative safety is nearby, and without difficulty I just pick her up like a bag of cement head out of the main road. I just cannot work this out, but black jeans... black hoodie... black boots... black road... as I put her onto her feet it becomes immediately clear how this is possible, and I remark in genuine sorrow "oh but you shouldn't be running out from behind cars... you're tiny!" She sorrowfully remarks, standing a good 4ft 4 next to me, the size of a 7 year old, holding her head and bleeding through her fingers, "I know... I'm sorry... I didn't hear you! I didn't seee you! Oh my god it heet me like nuuuthing was there! I didn't see you! I point at the lurid hi-vis jacket and obviously-illuminated flashing bike mangled in the road like "c'mon... I'm trying... what's with the tinted-out ninja outfit and ambushing people from behind cars?" and she looks at me like "where the hell did you get all of that from without me seeing it?!"

I quickly get her round a few corners and inside, HQ is on a busy junction, and we apply some basic first aid from the kit. Loads of blood. She doesn't like any irritating disinfectant type stuff into the wound, but I'm looking into this bleeding hole in her head, and there's little bits of road in there. Big hole in head. Big gash over eye. Very swollen. Apply ice from local shop. Very concerned. Left prefrontal lobe isn't ideal to get a smack, she might not be making sense. She's profoundly upset and a bit concussed, and is obviously mortified that today's makeover is a bit part in ER, and that this day will probably be written into her face for quite some time. She wasn't really familiar with London, in barcelona they don't really have hectic diesel traffic and 4-lane junction hustle the way we do, nor does it ever go pitch black. She's rather lost in this big city and now has just become startled roadkill, bleeding tearfully all over the couch.

It wasn't too hard to work it out from her account, as we treated her injuries and called an ambulance. She had seen the motorbike pizza guy whizz past with the box on his back. She'd looked round, eyes following the motorbike and darted out about three paces into the dark, from behind the car, looking the wrong way. Perfectly timed her exit into the road, navigating by audio, for a no-warning, no-brakes double-blind corner chance meeting with a bicycle that makes almost no sound, no squeaks or rattles, and I'd cut her down with a "thunk" sound like the grim reaper crossed with a lumberjack. The front wheel had fired her upwards by the lower body, that was the baseball bat experience, and the handlebars had then clubbed her outwards into the road, shearing off. From my perspective "Hey where'd the bike go" bars and pedals snatched away into thin air, sending me into a flying superman no-bike endo bail before I could even figure out what had happened in those split seconds in the darkness. Not one photon of her did I see, and I hit her point blank, 2ft from my eyes. She just popped out black on black, like the invisible wall, or a stage-hand.

There was a 20ft gap between me and that bike, at about 25mph that's equivalent to a few feet at 7mph, she was watching the pizza delivery bike as she stepped out black hoodie zipped up to the nose, black on black into my path. It genuinely looked like an invisible wall to me, but I could see how it could happen as she popped out. Ambushed by a 4ft 4 black hooded ninja. She'd been hit by the handlebars and front wheel, and fired about 10ft out at 45 degrees, landed on her head without even putting an arm out, was lucky not to fracture her skull thanks to the fact that she probably weighed all of 50kg, completely miniature, size 4 shoes etc. From barcelona. In Dark Rainy London. Running out from behind dark cars, not at the lights, out from behind moving vehicles. Looking the wrong way. Heard the loud pizza delivery two-stroke honda disappearing off at 60mph down an empty dark road, hadn't seen past the tall mini-box-van pizza box, nor over the top of it, run out behind, no looking, black silhouette on black tarmac, 0.2s later BANG straight into the back of her, firing her into the air. She probably thought she'd been hit by a car. Good thing I wasn't a motorbike courier on a well-tuned yamaha 600, that'd have been broken ribs minimum.

It was like hitting the proverbial invisible wall, normal riding, coast visibly clear... BANG "oh man... that sucks... I just had an accident and am now flying upside down in a vague superman position", but luckily know how to put an arm out without breaking it, and had escaped with a guilt-inducingly minor injuries. Kevlar jacket is a very good idea. The bike, on the other hand, was bash-up. We'd all been scattered like particles at CERN, I was 25ft from the crash site, bike made it about 8ft, she went 10-15ft.

It took the ambulance an hour to arrive. Multiple calls to 999, each time describing her unfortunate and genuinely pretty severe head injury. Bastards were lying to us, saying they'd sent an ambulance but there was no answer. We had 4 people running about in the street flagging down ambulances. She was not really in a positive state. You can die from that sort of impact, internal injuries, stroke, embolism, swelling, all sorts. The NHS we can see have sent about 5 ambulances down the road to some building site accident, they are clustered, and we had 4 people attempting to flag them down like taxis running around in the road. What is with the computer system lying to the telephone operators and filing false reports? Whole serious crew on the job of save the lady from this atrocious and concerning head injury running about in the road? The NHS are not getting better, that's for sure.

She gets on the phone. Her mates turn up. More of her mates turn up. We now have a Spanish tribe. Paramedic turns up. Paramedic agrees it's hospital time, calls ambulance. Ambulance turns up, half the spanish tribe and the poor miniature lady are loaded into it. I'm standing outside the front door with the bike propped up on the wall. Cops turn up. Cops look at the hi-vis and 200mm disk brake, no words are exchanged, I can obviously wait and am not dying. In the back of the van, small interview presumably taking place. One cop takes the car up the road & looks at the street lights missing their tops down half the street, shining a torch about. Returning in the police car, cops park up behind the ambulance & file a report via walkie talkie, wave at me embarassed / apologetically, and drive off without even saying a word to me. Girl comes to the door of the ambulance and says "OK I go hospital now" and I'm pleased, because stitching up wounds the NHS are pretty efficient at. We produce a variety wounds of many sources in London. I keep in touch while she's in the hospital. Next day I'm reading through the SMSs, and thinking to myself "anybody would think from reading these that I was her abusive boyfriend who'd overstepped the mark... that's... umm... well... y'see... this is the problem with all this surveillance, you'd never know what's going on from reading the emails...".

She comes round to say hello a week later and thanks for the emergency conversion of the studio into a field hospital, looking a little like a latino chuckie, with a bunch of stitching holding her head back together. Amazingly she's not missing a piece of her head, it's all been put back into place. Give it a few years and there'll hardly be a scar... but a good 24 stitches, and a lot of bruising.

Sure technically it's not my fault, but there are measures one can take to minimise the easily available potential for accidents.

As she left, not looking terribly sprightly, I was thinking to myself "none of dat. None. none of dat. we want *none* of dat. zero. quite enough. terrible. bummer. must be 100% avoided. good thing I wasn't a motorbike (nearly 100% probablility of coming a cropper on those every 3 months... no way am I doing 50mph traffic lottery on 1/4 of a tonne of metal round here). Hmm... motorbikes you see coming though...".

The odds add up when you spend maybe 25-40 hours on inner-city streets a week.

Probably about time I send her some flowers to celebrate the damage becoming invisible.

So... thinking about it there's two things.

Nº1 simply ride in the middle of the road, no skimming past any parked car business. Overtake cars on the outside, overtake invisible cars on the outside also, filter like the road is full of cars, nowhere near the pavement. In order to pick up a bit of speed and get past a danger area, make sure that there's a good 20ft of nobody and nothing front & sides, and no potential surprises. If both lanes are empty, religiously use the middle of the road. Even if it looks optimal to track near the kerb-line to just get past a block of one normal car and a pair of black SUVs, it isn't. The kerb emits pedestrians and car doors spontaneously when you're least expecting it.

Pretty much the worst damage I've done to anybody in years.

Luckily a bike crash, so long as you're not involved with motor vehicles, the damage won't be mortal. Motor vehicles one small mistake or bit of bad luck and you can knock a few walls down and /or kill / grievously maim people.

The other idea is

Nº2: people can't see where you're going to be... unless you shine a light there.


___________

So on the latest post-crash overhaul for the general daily lock-up buzzing around made of metal bike:

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Motorbike trials handlebars rather than mountain bike ones. Much wider & more relaxed riding position, not too heavy. Hope C2 back brake on the back wheel, new mech & dropout, custom carbon chainguide to stop the single ring on the front dropping the chain due to chain spank,

...and a small silver box clipped to the forks which does this in pitch dark theatre blackout:

Surprisingly handy as a portable work light, not just for riding around with:

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It paints a pretty fierce pool of light in front of the vehicle, so that people can see you coming and there's something visible where the bike may end up in the near future, giving people a visible warning even round a corner.

Makes a big difference being able to see what you're riding on in areas with bad street-lighting and overgrown trees, really common in London, no probs if you bring your own street light.

Runs off a chunky lithium power pack which I've hidden under the seat.

_____________

The one that can't really be chained up but will get you anywhere in London quicker than even a helicopter has received a spring clean and a much better front brake system with a bigger rotor, the old one was not oil-tolerant, weak caliper and tiny rotor, and puddles are always oily on the top because of physics, so even a 160mm rotor and Ok caliper after a bit of grimey puddle just squeaked a lot and stopped sort of for miles, need stuff that's good enough for an emergency even in dysfunctional condtitions.

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Hope M4 brake works and then some. And then some more. And then seriously how much braking could you ever need. And then some more. The caliper housing is about two inches thick! See clipper lighter for size reference, calipers. Beefy. The feel is so chalk and cheese compared to canti or V brakes, would recommend hydraulic disk to anybody as a better brake.


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Not only are the hubs Titanium, the skewers are also. Great stuff, light like aluminium but strong like steel.

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Neat weird-fitting 5 bolt 135mm lightweight rotor is easily enough to lock the back wheel and start stripping rubber off the tyre, same size as the biggest ring on the oldschool XTR titanium 9 speed cassette. Makes a nice noise, very dry, no metallic tinkling.


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Am rather pleased with how cross-bracing with zipties stiffens up water bottles, once modified they make very good mudguards, water bottles being waterpoof and all. Dutch grandma-bike mudguards are a kilo and a half each. I do not want any kg of mudguards. But nor do I want a wet arse. The silver stuff is leftover mirror film for theatre sets, metallised but same sort of thickness PET type stuff as the bottle, held on with a couple of office staples.

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Anything I'm working with that's reflective, holographic, fluorescent or retroreflective, I stick an offcut onto the bike.

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Made lots of lights nice and light by taking the LED and watch-battery element out of a bunch of cheap chinese lights, stuffing it in a ziplock bag and zip-tying them to the seat and seatpost. Ironically, the heavy plastic clamps they use to attach lights to bikes tend to shear off within a few hours of riding, some sort of shock will usually destroy the mount, whereas a plastic bag and a ziptie and importantly *no extra weight* has been working now for months, hasn't failed or come off. The surplus housings amounted to a substantial pile of heavy badly made plastic and mild steel bolts.

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The result is quite bright in car headlights.

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________

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I have fitted a small rave to the back of it

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Including lasers.

________

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I am so pleased with it that I have taken to hanging it on the wall like a painting. Also keeps it out of the way. The center of gravity is very much where I want it.

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The best part is actually the smallest, a small switch on the handlebars which when engaged makes the forks brutally rigid, a sensation and amount of agile speed very similar to a 700C carbon road bike. Pretty scary. Flick the switch and it's plush ride over everything mountain bike mode. Most roads in London require suspension, very hard and bumpy surface.
Last edited by bishopdante on Fri May 22, 2015 4:22 pm, edited 22 times in total.
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby crustandcrumb on Tue May 19, 2015 5:53 pm

I want a Surly ECR. Not sure how one would ride unloaded, but a 29+ rig with relaxed geometry is, on paper, extremely appealing to me.

Also, some day I will definitely own a fork with a segmented crown.
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby Rodabod on Tue May 19, 2015 7:07 pm

I see that companies are now selling single chainring group sets for simplified commuter bikes or racers. Took them a while. I've always run a single ring on the front plus a Paul chain keeper. Just used larger range MTB cassettes rather than road ones.
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby bishopdante on Tue May 19, 2015 7:23 pm

Rodabod wrote:single ring on the front plus a Paul chain keeper.


After having run a single on the front and a springy mech on the back with no chainguard or chainguide a few times, I would highly recommend a chain keeper, had a few unpleasant spinning-pedals incidents from riding around with no chainguard. The chain has plenty of slack and bobbles around, swinging from side to side and if unrestrained happily derails off the front ring at exactly that time when you really don't want it happening, going up or coming off something standing up on the pedals.

Add a chainguide and gears on the back works out sturdier than a BMX drivetrain, makes a few weird scrape noises from time to time but nothing is allowed out of line full stop, chain has no choice but to stay on the ring no matter how much you wiggle the chain about, way less hassle than a front gear changer.

A shifter, mech, handful of bolts and a bunch of cable adds up to a kilo in many cases, also.

_______________________

After riding super wide motorbike bars on the aluminium frame, the carbon bike started to feel a bit cramped, like riding around on a 1940s motorbike, all hunched up. Previous riser bars were 650mm or so.

Pulled off the old ones and installed some wider 750mm-ish ones:

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It's only a matter of 12cm, but it makes a big difference to the amount of balance and leverage on the bike. 100% enjoying the ride now, mind-controlled magic carpet experience.

I am calling the degree of width, controls, cabling, suspension and substantial, heavy-looking appearance and committed width the "anti-fixie".

It's simple, nobody should ever be putting bikes down gaps in traffic narrower than the width of those bars. Nowhere near that narrow should you ride down, you'd be better off calling an ambulance, waiting 20 minutes, and then throwing yourself down some stairs.

Find below "fixie".

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[I abhor these velocipedes, I have only ever ridden such machines under duress, they are simply not fit for mixing with any traffic, or even pedestrians. Front brake minimum, freewheel unless you're a complete masochist. This one is owned by some anonymous nutter, photo nicked from some forum thread saying "these people are suicidal"],

It's got no brakes, no freewheel, no handlebars, nothing to weigh the bike down. Death trap levels of safety and comfort.

A bit like dark matter, Anti-fixie while being opposite to fixie and occupying a fair bit more space, actually weighs less than fixie.
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby cjh on Tue Jun 09, 2015 5:42 am

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Hit a pothole at speed the week before last and turned a crisis into an opportunity, much as I loved my old road bike it wasn't the best choice for year-round commuting and the routes on my way in are like a war zone. We've amicably parted company.

Enter the new ride, a 2015 Genesis Croix De Fer, in the most boring colour scheme they've ever made. I like the white frame but it looked so much better with the original brown bar tape and seat, an easy cosmetic tweak I'll set about down the line, along with tyre geekery.

I think it's a little under-specced for the outlay but it's still a major step-up for me. I'm not troubled by the increase in frame and wheel weight and the steel soaks up the jolts and vibrations a treat. Everything just seems to work, it's a joy to ride. Had a few spins around the park over the last few evenings and it's nice to be able to roar across the grass again.
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby Rodabod on Tue Jun 09, 2015 6:59 am

Nice bike, CJH. I'd love to have a commuter/do-everything bike like that.

bishopdante wrote:Image


This doesn't look that dissimilar to my old Rockhopper FS which I rode since 1998 until about maybe 2010. I fitted the widest Titec risers I could get, platform pedals, and ran Continental slicks on it. Reasonably fast, and great for control. You could bunnyhop anything you didn't like the look of. I kept the STX RC groupset clean, and it worked perfectly for its lifetime, with no particularly noticeable wear.
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby Verbs & Nouns on Thu Jun 11, 2015 5:35 pm

So I broke the forks on my Heuvelmans CX frame a while back, so I swapped the SRAM Rival group set over to the Cannondale (formerly Cannondale Rack). This was always a temporary solution until I saved up enough to buy a new frame (and then I cracked the Cannondale). I wasn't sure what frame to get (was looking at the All City Mr Pink and some secondhand touring frames on eBay), when my friends shop got a Space Horse in. I wasn't initially sold on it, and was hesitant to go back to canti's, but after looking at some builds online I put a deposit it on there and started saving some $$$ for it (and a trip to Japan). This is my first brand new frame, so it's pretty exciting.

What I wanted was a bike to do (almost) everything. I missed the bigger tyres of my CX bike, but liked the gearing of my road bike, but hated how limiting it was. I was also sick of clip on mudguards (the rattling and poor coverage), so I wanted full guards and I missed having a front rack. Hopefully this will cover commuting, longer hill rides (with a lot of gravel / single track) and maybe some (very light) touring.

The build came together reasonably easily, except for the front rack which took some grinding to fit. Took it out briefly this afternoon and I'm in love. It's everything I wanted in a frame. It rides awesome and fits perfectly.

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Took it for its first proper (not commuting) ride last Monday. It was foggy. Bike rode great though.

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• Frame and fork: 55cm All City Space Horse

• Wheels and tyres: H+Son Archetype to Shimano 105 hubs, Clement X'Plor MSO 700x32

• Groupset: SRAM Rival shifters, cranks and dérailleurs, compact gearing (34/50), GXP bottom bracket. Shimano XT MTB 11-32 Cassette, SRAM 10speed chain.

• Pedals: Time ATAC Aliums

• Bar and Stem: Salsa Cowbell 2 (42cm I think, or 40cm) and a Sim Works by Nitto Dirty Rhonda stem. Lizard Skins DSP tape, MASH SF bar ends.

• Headset: Cane Creek S8, MASH SF top cap.

• Seat and seat post: 1990 Flite (reissue) and stock Giant two bolt seat post.

• Brakes: Tektro CR720's with Kool Stop Salmon pads

• Misc: SKS P45 Longboard mudguards, Soma porteur rack, Spur Cycles bell, Velo Orange "Moderniste" bidon cages.
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby benadrian on Thu Jun 11, 2015 5:58 pm

Love it V&N
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby Verbs & Nouns on Fri Jun 12, 2015 3:42 am

Cheers.
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby crustandcrumb on Fri Aug 07, 2015 12:29 am

I won't detail how (it involves a backward stem and a pair of alt-bars), but tonight I set up one of my bikes with about the most upright and ergonomically comfortable/neutral position possible, àl a the Dutch.

This was a revelation for me. Just pedaling around in this position is insanely good. You won't have this much fun since childhood

I would like to set up a 29er in this fashion and see if it's possible not to kill yourself riding trails with such an extreme position.
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby Josef K on Fri Aug 07, 2015 4:16 pm

cjh wrote:Image



Nice bike CJH. I like the Black & White.

Getting reacquainted with my Croix for the past two weeks commuting after getting knocked off the Equilibrium biking to work. I'm getting it back tomorrow from the cycle shop but think I'll keep it for weekend runs and continue using the Croix for commutes. Here it is will a newly fitted re-sprayed rack ( it's the best paint colour match for the seat / bar tape Halfords could manage but I think it keeps the 'retro' look and feel.Image
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby Josef K on Fri Aug 07, 2015 5:09 pm

benadrian wrote:Love it V&N


Me too.
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby flytox on Sat Sep 12, 2015 10:08 am

All you great esthetes of the PRF! I need your help...

I love my bike. It´s an old Italian racer from the late 70s (Francesco Moser 51.151). Of course, the frame has suffered some damage to the paintwork, there´s even some rust on it.

Because of some repair work on the ball bearing, I´ll have the main parts removed. A great chance to have the frame repaint. Now I have to choose a color until Monday!

I could choose a typical 70s color...or would something timeless be better? I can´t decide! It´s really tough.

Please all you good people...suggest me some great colors (or color combinations) for an old racing bike!
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Re: Let us see your bike.

Postby sparky on Sun Sep 13, 2015 3:10 pm

flytox wrote:Please all you good people...suggest me some great colors (or color combinations) for an old racing bike!


Mine is red trimmed with white: obvious, but cuts a dash.
Image

However, I like the cruel bling of this gold and black job I saw during the same holiday:

Image

If I ever get another bike, I've a mad urge to make it bright yellow. I should mention I have slight colour-blindness, though!

F Moser made some fantastic bikes. Do show your ride when it is ready, flytox.
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