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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby JimSchu on Wed Feb 15, 2017 5:06 pm

Changing a flat tire is a skill no cyclist should be without.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby Madman Munt on Wed Feb 15, 2017 5:27 pm

JimSchu wrote:Changing a flat tire is a skill no cyclist should be without.


It isn't difficult either, if you know what you are doing. My tip would be to practice a few times when you get new tires so you know what to expect. Because, chances are you'll end up getting a flat when it's cold and dirty, your legs and brain are jelly and your fingers are stiff and useless.

Here's how to do it properly:

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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby tmoneygetpaid on Thu Feb 16, 2017 1:10 pm

Also, get good tires. I've ridden on tons and tons of tires- Vittoria, Continental, Schwalbe, Panaracer, Kenda, etc. The price difference between good and bad tires is worth it. I was flatting about once or twice a week on my daily commute on mid-priced tires. Decided to try Schwalbe Marathon Plus and I literally have not flatted in two years on my main everyday rider.

Still, you should carry a patch kit and travel kit, and a spare tube. Don't be one of those people who tosses a tube that could be patched, save the spare tube for something catastrophic to the tube, like ripping the valve out of the tube.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby emmanuelle cunt on Fri Feb 17, 2017 5:17 am

I still carry a spare tube and patches+glue but at all times, how much sense is there in that when I didn't have a flat in 27 months, I don't know.



Anyone else find gearing on the bikes is largely on the 'too big' size? I run 28-38-48 and custom 12-28 cassette ('custom' as in 12T sprocket circle is from old Sunrace cassette, 14T I bough alone and rest is from 11-28 Shimano one). So with highest gear of just 48-12 and keeping the cadence at about 85-90rpm on paper I'm capable of reaching speeds between 44-47 km/h. The one time last year I was actually doing 45-48km/h on the flat with massive back wind and a truck 10 yards in front of me I was still in 48-14, I guess I like to spin. I used the highest gear twice last year, both times going downhill at 65km/h or slightly more and that is already really fast for me. So in real world I regularly go to third highest gear (48-15), when I'm in relative shape I sometimes use the second to highest gear (48-14) and once in a blue moon I engage the highest one (48-12) just too see whether it is really too high. It always is.

So, as I don't like having things on my bike I don't use, I'm probably going to get a Shimano Claris cassette (8 speed, 13-26) or switch the biggest chain ring in the front to 44, but I'm not sure how would the latter option work with front derailleur. Having a 26-36-46 chainrings would be great, but sadly two options available at are 28-38-48 and 26-36-48. 46T chainring are in higher-end, cyclecross groupsets and cost a lot.

Occasionally I look at bikes with road/cyclecross groupsets as I love riding in the hoods position (but I hate the fact brake/shifts levers built was built for keeping your hand in the drops, which I hate, and it doesn't even make sense aero-wise), and even the 'compact' gearing for 'slower' riders gives a highest gear of 50-11. That's 53,4 km/h at 90 rpm, I think that's almost exactly what the current one hour record is. At pro-cadence of 100rpm it's 59,3 km/h. Bollocks to that. I'm aware it may be necessary when you race and are in the bunch and there's a sprint in front so you want to keep up, but what parentage of the bike-buying crowd actually does that? 0.1%? Figure out your gearing, bike industry.

/rant.


edit: http://www.bikecalc.com/speed_at_cadence

this little site is very useful when thinking about gear ratios and what nots.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby Madman Munt on Fri Feb 17, 2017 7:16 am

emmanuelle cunt wrote:I still carry a spare tube and patches+glue but at all times, how much sense is there in that when I didn't have a flat in 27 months, I don't know.


It's so you don't feel a dick when someone asks you to help them and you can't.

When I rode 26" wheels, I'd never flat unless the tire was worn out or I'd massively overinflated it to go "faster*", so I'd never carry a tube or pump or patches. Then one day I passed guy sitting on his arse in Team Sky kit struggling with his bike. I slowed and he called out "Do you have a puncture repair kit? My glue has dried up!" I felt so bad I rode back home picked one up and rode back (it was only 3-4 miles), but it was too late. Now I carry a tube (sometimes two), and a mini pump at all times. Never patched in the wild. Pop your fresh tube in, patch when you get back. I should get some self-adhesive patches and leave the glue for home.

emmanuelle cunt wrote:Anyone else find gearing on the bikes is largely on the 'too big' size?


Yep. I used to be a proponent of the triple, but now a 46/30 double is what I'm aiming for. FSA has a few on their website; I've seen them on bikes in the shop, but not for sale individually yet.

When I had a compact double I put a Claris 46t in place of the 50t. Heavy, but more usable and not too expensive.

Now I've got 52/39/30. 12-25. Mostly use the middle ring, which I find a little under-geared. Cruising on the flat I've come use to the 52, but it's still overgeared. Every cog on the cassette is filthy- except the top two, which shine. 30 is great for steep hills. Split the difference on the top two rings and you have 46.

emmanuelle cunt wrote:Occasionally I look at bikes with road/cyclecross groupsets as I love riding in the hoods position (but I hate the fact brake/shifts levers built was built for keeping your hand in the drops, which I hate, and it doesn't even make sense aero-wise)


I love drop bars and use every position on pretty much every ride. Drops are good for hard effort, same back position as hoods but straighter arms for more comfort, or back lower than hoods and bent arms. And I only ever descend in the drops, which is when you really need to be on your brakes.

emmanuelle cunt wrote:edit: http://www.bikecalc.com/speed_at_cadence

this little site is very useful when thinking about gear ratios and what nots.


http://home.earthlink.net/~mike.sherman/shift.html

This is the one I use. It has more visual stuff for thickies.

You might like this:

http://yojimg.net/bike/web_tools/stem.php

*Really slower, because the front tires bounces all over and the rear flats all the time. It took me a long time to learn my lesson. I ended up booting the rear tire with Canadian Tire money and punishing it at 80psi until it was totally shredded.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby emmanuelle cunt on Wed Feb 22, 2017 7:56 am

Madman Munt wrote:
You might like this:

http://yojimg.net/bike/web_tools/stem.php

.



Ha, thanks, I would have used the fuck out of this site a little over a year ago when I was buying a frame and a fork and putting gear from my old bike on it. The old bike had a quill steam, new one was ahead so I spent way too much time measuring everything and doing my best to recall primary level school maths to calculate what angle and length of the stem I need to get the position I was aiming at (everything worked out great, eventually).
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby cerebralheadtrip on Wed Feb 22, 2017 5:37 pm

speaking of tires, whats a good upgrade from these. they came stock and ive put about 6k miles on them, probably time for something new

https://www.amazon.com/Kenda-Kwick-Tend ... B0081EOD50
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby Madman Munt on Wed Feb 22, 2017 7:26 pm

cerebralheadtrip wrote:speaking of tires, whats a good upgrade


Tires are a very personal thing and the right choice can transform your ride more than any other factor. But what works for me might not work for you.

What do you want from a tire? Durability? Flat resistance? Speed? Comfort? Grip? Price? How heavy is the load? Terrain and conditions you will be riding? How much clearance do you have? Are you a rider who gets flats?
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby cerebralheadtrip on Wed Feb 22, 2017 8:15 pm

i get like 3-4 flats every riding season (which i guess is one every few hundred miles or so? i do ~2500 miles a summer). i usually carry a spare tube with these. ride them pretty firm (100 psi or so) so pinch flats are rare, usually glass or some bit of metal, the usual. no real load to speak of other than myself. terrain is city/road riding. no crazy downhill descents or anything like that. no touring. but i do commute 25 miles RT daily in generally good weather but occasionally rain. i wouldnt mind a bit more speed (im guessing these are somewhat sluggish in that department but i also dont need high end racing tires). im also not opposed to just getting the same model again but on the other hand i dont really know what im missing out on. if i can get something that would give me a bit less rolling resistance without sacrificing stability/cornering id be all for that. given the amount i ride, a little incremental performance would be welcome.

this is the frame theyd be going onto

Image
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby bishopdante on Wed Feb 22, 2017 9:15 pm

Some decent 700c all-weather tires (in order of increasing weight and durability):
Hutchinson fusion 5 all season (tubeless or clincher)
Continental grand prix 4 season.
Kenda Nimbus
schwalbe marathon
Panaracer ribmo
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby emmanuelle cunt on Thu Feb 23, 2017 6:55 am

I used to ride on Kenda.. erm. Kenda Something Something, I was getting an occasional puncture but not more often than on other tires, one thing I remember was side wall, which was supper skinny, which quite quickly led to tire demise - I guess my weight cause it to fail at the point when side wall meets the most inner part so rim punctured the tube.

In terms of speed on hard surface knobs obviously are the enemy, bu you already have a very sensible thread, so I don't think there is other way than just read reviews of particular models.

http://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com ... athon-2015

This site does rolling resistance testing, as it turns out Schwalbe Marathon gives surprisingly little riding resistance. Obviously, more race/performance oriented tires will be way better, but they also wear way, way faster. Other way of looking for speed is try lowering your stem and thus reducing drag and seeing if you're still comfortable, I think you can gain the most here.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby Madman Munt on Thu Feb 23, 2017 11:12 am

cerebralheadtrip wrote:this is the frame theyd be going onto

Image


That is a lovely bike. I wouldn't mind one myself. You have medium reach brakes, right? I think I would give Panaracer Gravelking 28s (they do a 32 but it's more knobbly) a try. If I was feeling rich, Compass Stampede Pass Tyre - 700C x 32 mm. Both file tread road tires.

Currently riding Vittoria Open Pave 27c, which I fucking love. I run them at 70f/80r psi and have had 4 flats in 3000 miles. But they might not be tough enough for some and they've been discontinued anyway. I have a pair of the new Vittoria Corsa G+ 28c ready to go when my rear finally gives out. Again, another race tire, but they work for me. I'll take the extra flats and increased wear for a smoother ride. If you are spending over a hour on the road each day, why skimp on comfort?
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby bishopdante on Sat Feb 25, 2017 2:19 pm

emmanuelle cunt wrote:it turns out Schwalbe Marathon gives surprisingly little riding resistance.


The only weakness of the Marathons is the 730g per tyre weight (excluding tubes). They are sturdy as can be, though.

For reference, the Continental 4season tires are approx 1/3 of the weight, at 230g.

Saving 500g per tire on a bike's weight may or may not be a big deal, but paying close attention to the tires is probably the cheapest weight saving measure. A kilo is quite a lot.

Eg: losing 500g by using a different pair of cranks can be done, but only if you have 1kg cranks in the first place. 500g cranks are rare and expensive.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby Madman Munt on Fri Apr 14, 2017 5:53 pm

Hey, if you have been cycling a lot or just getting on a bit and parts of you are too stiff and others are too loose, then you should check out this book before you get some imbalances that will fuck your shit right up:

Image

Ride Strong: Essential Conditioning for Cyclists by Jo McRae.

I came across it in the library a couple of days ago, and it's exactly what I have been looking for. I've been trying to piece together this stuff from various non-cycling related sources but here it is all laid out for you: common physical problems that can be caused by prolonged cycling and simple simple exercises to prevent them. This muscle gets tight: stretch it like this; that muscle gets weak: strengthen it like that.

I've found some (surprisingly, hardly viewed) videos of the author presenting some of the ideas from the book.

phpBB [media]


Well worth watching all 13 parts.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby sparky on Mon Apr 17, 2017 7:13 am

^Ive just ordered that book and bookmarked the videos, as this looks bang on what I've been looking for for me and the girlfriend. Any ride over twenty miles leaves me crunchy and plank-like. Thank you Mr Munt.

I'm trying to be smarter over how I set up a bike. Browsing through Zinn's book I found this cross little late night margin-note from a sad evening of packing a bike:-

Image

I was almost in tears.

Bike advice beg: I seem to always lose a lot of strength after around fifty miles of riding with little ascent, and while I think a lot of it is just lack of practice, I also have trouble eating enough to keep me cheerful when I push onto 100 miles and beyond. I start feeling sick after a while. Flapjacks seem better for me, but not enough. I tried bacon rice cakes recently, which did the trick until they got too warm. Warm bacon rice cakes are nasty. Suspect the answer is ultimately "ride more", but advice welcome.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby emmanuelle cunt on Tue Apr 18, 2017 3:50 am

Those videos are great, thanks indeed for linking to them!

Well as I a result of a carefully planned eating strategy I've been on for years I always have lots of custom DIY fuel I can burn when I cycle, I think it's called 'excessive body fat'. However, a few days ago I was cycling with a friend of mine who is very fit, he had a bag of almonds, walnuts and cranberries (bought separately and just mixed in one bag) - this stuff felt great, I'm going to copy this too. Here's a recipe by a lady who takes care of pro cyclist needs, looks great, but I couldn't ever force my self to actually try it. I usually stick to Snickers and bananas.

Obvious and not food relating tip is pacing yourself. No matter how tempting going fast seems after 20 miles when you're in rhythm and feeling great, it's not a good idea on long rides. Also, introducing some intervals on shorter rides does help to improve the overall endurance which matters on longer ones. I do 'one minutes of riding fast / 30 seconds of recovery' times 4, break, same thing more time, and maybe one more time on the way back if I feel like it.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby Madman Munt on Tue Apr 18, 2017 12:35 pm

sparky wrote:I was almost in tears.


My worst pedal experience was trying to get one off with a 6" adjustable wrench stuck into the end of a vacuum cleaner tube.

Advice: Check if your pedals can be removed with allen keys. If not get those shits off and dispose of them responsibly. Get some new ones that do. Now when you want to remove them you rotate the pedal to the bottom, stick the allen key in pointing to the rear wheel, stomp on it and then: Crack! your pedal is loosened. Be sure to grease your spindle before insertion and don't screw it in too hard.

sparky wrote:Bike advice beg: I seem to always lose a lot of strength after around fifty miles of riding with little ascent, and while I think a lot of it is just lack of practice, I also have trouble eating enough to keep me cheerful when I push onto 100 miles and beyond. I start feeling sick after a while. Flapjacks seem better for me, but not enough. I tried bacon rice cakes recently, which did the trick until they got too warm. Warm bacon rice cakes are nasty. Suspect the answer is ultimately "ride more", but advice welcome.


I bet it's 100% a fuelling problem. I rode under-watered and under-fuelled for years. I wondered why I wasn't getting any faster and felt like shit at the end of rides. I also got really skinny (TdF GC contender skinny, which is stupid unless you actually want to ride up mountains for three weeks in a row) and pretty weak.

How about ham sandwiches on soft white bread? Bananas, lovely big medjool dates, Haribo/Jelly Babies, sugar-water drinks are also good. Be sure to drink enough too. And don't set off hungry. You might want to stay away from fat and fibre on the bike if you are going hard. Lots of carbs and a bit of protein. I personally can't process a Snickers bar at full gas.

Recovery drink: chocolate milk.

Oh, warm up slowly. First 10 miles is a warm up only.

[edit] Just want to add that sticky, sugary foods and drinks can really fuck up your teeth, especially consumed in a little-and-often manner as you might on a bike. So be aware. I'm not sure I have reliable solution for this problem. Avoid overly acidic "sports drinks"? Maybe a swill of water after each snack is better than nothing?
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby cerebralheadtrip on Tue Apr 18, 2017 1:49 pm

Madman Munt wrote:
cerebralheadtrip wrote:this is the frame theyd be going onto

Image


That is a lovely bike. I wouldn't mind one myself. You have medium reach brakes, right? I think I would give Panaracer Gravelking 28s (they do a 32 but it's more knobbly) a try. If I was feeling rich, Compass Stampede Pass Tyre - 700C x 32 mm. Both file tread road tires.

Currently riding Vittoria Open Pave 27c, which I fucking love. I run them at 70f/80r psi and have had 4 flats in 3000 miles. But they might not be tough enough for some and they've been discontinued anyway. I have a pair of the new Vittoria Corsa G+ 28c ready to go when my rear finally gives out. Again, another race tire, but they work for me. I'll take the extra flats and increased wear for a smoother ride. If you are spending over a hour on the road each day, why skimp on comfort?


thanks, its served me well! great city/commuter/touring bike. unfortunately Soma seems to have mostly gotten out of the complete bike game, but they still sell the frames.

thanks for the recs too, ill definitely consider these
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby tmoneygetpaid on Tue Apr 18, 2017 3:52 pm

I'm telling you- Schwalbe Marathon Plus. If you can deal with the weight, you can put these on and not worry about flatting.

On a bike trip a few years ago I met a Dutch guy who was basically a non-stop tourer. He rode everyday 10 months of the year just touring all over the world. He swore by the Marathon Plus, it was the only tire he trusted. He also recommended AGAINST the folding version of any Marathons, if I remember, because they had melted on searing hot pavement on a summer day when he was in the Southwest while the Marathon Plus non-folding stood up to the task.
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Re: Bicycle/Bicycling Advice

Postby cerebralheadtrip on Wed Apr 19, 2017 11:40 am

i actually went into my bike shop yesterday and just decided to keep it simple and buy some Gatorskins. at 95 psi they already feel more comfortable on harsh pavement than my old set. i noticed an a little increase in gripiness too. pretty happy. thought about going with something a little lighter, but biking in chicago, it just dosent make sense.

heres the thing tho, they were a BITCH to get on my rim. ive changed tons of flats in my day and never really had an issue. but i was seriously struggling in the shop to get these things on. took me a good half hour or so do the pair. amazing i didnt pop a tube or two in the process.
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