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Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby W.L.Weller on Thu Feb 09, 2017 5:00 pm

Image

What's the thread size and pitch for a steam radiator air vent? The bolt pictured is an M10 1.0, which seems to be as close to correct as something can be that's still not correct. Also it doesn't make any sense that a 40-50 year old radiator in New York would have metric anything. The snapped-off nub didn't fit into the 3/8"-24 test sample at Home Despot, and the nub definitely has tighter thread spacing when held up to a 24 tpi bolt.

But the actual thread on the actual replacement air vent (seen here as the snapped-off nub) doesn't really thread in any easier. I did my best to clean up the female threads on the radiator (short of chasing them with the correct size tap) and the replacement air vent threaded in far enough where I don't think it's going to leak. The issue is that the air vent is still sticking far enough out of the radiator where I'm worried it's going to get snapped off like the last 2 have.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby eliya on Mon Feb 20, 2017 11:45 pm

What's a good mildew and mold repellent/whatever to use before re-caulking a tub?
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby tbone on Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:43 pm

eliya wrote:What's a good mildew and mold repellent/whatever to use before re-caulking a tub?


Not sure about a repellant other than just being diligent about cleaning it. But this works great to clean moldy bathtubs: Mix a paste together of baking soda and bleach. If shit is really nasty, put it on super thick and then cover with plastic wrap to keep it on there for a longer time without drying out. After a while rinse it off and then let it dry completely before re-caulking.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby eliya on Wed Feb 22, 2017 12:11 pm

tbone wrote:
eliya wrote:What's a good mildew and mold repellent/whatever to use before re-caulking a tub?


Not sure about a repellant other than just being diligent about cleaning it. But this works great to clean moldy bathtubs: Mix a paste together of baking soda and bleach. If shit is really nasty, put it on super thick and then cover with plastic wrap to keep it on there for a longer time without drying out. After a while rinse it off and then let it dry completely before re-caulking.


You posted a link to that thing of Facebook a while back. I used it and it did remove the mold, but unfortunately it also pulled some of the caulk. Anyway, I tried Tilex mold and mildew repellent product and it works really well for removing mold. So I'm going to use it next time before I recaulk.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby jimmy two hands on Mon Mar 13, 2017 7:27 pm

Hello, my fuggin' roof has a fuggin' leak in it. The roof is pretty new, installed in something like 2010 or 2012, but based on the lady who owned the place before us, some hack job was hired to do things on the cheap and the sealing on the seams has come apart in a few places over the course of the winter. Some lovely water got in and caused a little damage and some mold got into the wall in a few spots. Our insurance is covering the mold contractor but we're on our own for the roof repairs.Fuck-a my life! Anybody know a good roofing contractor in Chimpago?
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby eliya on Mon May 29, 2017 8:30 pm

I'm building a radiator cover and I want to direct the heat away from the top of the cover. I read that sheet metal above the radiator can help with that. Is this true? What are some other heat "repellent" materials I could use from prevent the top of the cover (and what's on top of it) from heating up?

The front of the radiator will have openings to let the heat out towards the room.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby djimbe on Mon May 29, 2017 9:26 pm

eliya wrote:I'm building a radiator cover and I want to direct the heat away from the top of the cover. I read that sheet metal above the radiator can help with that. Is this true? What are some other heat "repellent" materials I could use from prevent the top of the cover (and what's on top of it) from heating up?

The front of the radiator will have openings to let the heat out towards the room.


My dad built a great enclosure for the radiator in my bedroom when I was in jr./sr. high school. He built a box around it, then used a bit of sheet metal to make a smooth curve from the top front down to the bottom back. Ya dig? If a guy was to fill this with some rigid or loose fiberglass it would help with loss to the back. If a guy was to do this with some polished aluminum or stainless steel pointing out from behind the radiator it might help with reflective transmission.

Build your box a buncha inches taller than the radiator and fill the top with rigid fiberglass insulation. 4" should be plenty. The horizontal part of the curving metal is the bottom support for the rigid glass. You probably want a a cleat on each side near the front for the metal.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby pwalshj on Wed Jun 14, 2017 12:56 am

eliya wrote:
tbone wrote:
eliya wrote:What's a good mildew and mold repellent/whatever to use before re-caulking a tub?


Not sure about a repellant other than just being diligent about cleaning it. But this works great to clean moldy bathtubs: Mix a paste together of baking soda and bleach. If shit is really nasty, put it on super thick and then cover with plastic wrap to keep it on there for a longer time without drying out. After a while rinse it off and then let it dry completely before re-caulking.


You posted a link to that thing of Facebook a while back. I used it and it did remove the mold, but unfortunately it also pulled some of the caulk. Anyway, I tried Tilex mold and mildew repellent product and it works really well for removing mold. So I'm going to use it next time before I recaulk.

Save the bottle and fill it with 50/50 bleach and water in the future. It's what's in the bottle minus the scent and the nozzles on those seem to hold up to the bleach better than a regular spray bottle.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby pwalshj on Wed Jun 14, 2017 1:40 am

W.L.Weller wrote:Image

What's the thread size and pitch for a steam radiator air vent? The bolt pictured is an M10 1.0, which seems to be as close to correct as something can be that's still not correct. Also it doesn't make any sense that a 40-50 year old radiator in New York would have metric anything. The snapped-off nub didn't fit into the 3/8"-24 test sample at Home Despot, and the nub definitely has tighter thread spacing when held up to a 24 tpi bolt.

But the actual thread on the actual replacement air vent (seen here as the snapped-off nub) doesn't really thread in any easier. I did my best to clean up the female threads on the radiator (short of chasing them with the correct size tap) and the replacement air vent threaded in far enough where I don't think it's going to leak. The issue is that the air vent is still sticking far enough out of the radiator where I'm worried it's going to get snapped off like the last 2 have.

I know I'm late to the thread but I'm also in Queens. I started composing a detailed walk-through but realized it would be easier to hit me up when the next heating season starts and I'll pop by and walk you through it. Mad simple. It's likely 1/8" NPT, btw.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby total_douche on Wed Jun 14, 2017 2:00 am

I've had about as much of smelly carpets as I can take, so in the near-future I'm going to be nuking the carpets in my living room and hallway, and replacing them with something better (which is, presumably, anything but). Do any of you have experience with laminate flooring in humid climates? It's looking like the best compromise for me, but I'm worried about how well it'll handle Minnesota, since running the air conditioning all summer is out of the question (it costs way too much). Maybe I should just use linoleum...
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby elisha wiesner on Wed Jun 14, 2017 10:02 am

They make laminate flooring designed for high humidity areas like basements. It's called HPL. Seems to work well.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby tmoneygetpaid on Wed Jun 14, 2017 11:58 am

total_douche wrote:I've had about as much of smelly carpets as I can take, so in the near-future I'm going to be nuking the carpets in my living room and hallway, and replacing them with something better (which is, presumably, anything but). Do any of you have experience with laminate flooring in humid climates? It's looking like the best compromise for me, but I'm worried about how well it'll handle Minnesota, since running the air conditioning all summer is out of the question (it costs way too much). Maybe I should just use linoleum...


We put down vinyl plank flooring in our basement kitchen area. Easy to install, doesn't need anything under it if the floor is even remotely level, decently cheap, and has a 50-year warranty. We've rolled a fridge over it abusively a number of times when we were doing work and it doesn't show any scrapes or anything. Recommended.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby Janeway on Thu Jun 15, 2017 11:55 pm

^in the meantime, sprinkle a little baby powder scattered on the carpet and when you vaccuum it up it kinda freshens the carpet air and it only sets you back a dollar. once a week should do it.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby Janeway on Thu Jun 15, 2017 11:59 pm

^this is by no means a long term solution, but if you want that smell out of that carpet that's how to do it. and it's only a dollar.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby Tommy on Fri Jun 16, 2017 12:26 pm

total_douche wrote:I've had about as much of smelly carpets as I can take, so in the near-future I'm going to be nuking the carpets in my living room and hallway, and replacing them with something better (which is, presumably, anything but). Do any of you have experience with laminate flooring in humid climates? It's looking like the best compromise for me, but I'm worried about how well it'll handle Minnesota, since running the air conditioning all summer is out of the question (it costs way too much). Maybe I should just use linoleum...


Laminate flooring sucks. So much suck. Just a few years in and we've got a couple of gaps in every room from humidity shifts. This is on first and second floors. Spill water on it? Forget about it. The edges swell. Unless there is some super durable high-end shit, I wouldn't recommend it.

Maybe there's hardwood flooring under your carpet?
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby icing on Fri Jun 16, 2017 1:00 pm

total_douche wrote:smelly carpets - laminate flooring


forget laminate flooring. all the same reasons. gaps start showing up, put it by an exit door? within a year it'll bubble and delaminate. oh, and it's super fing loud. all it's good for is blocking rf if you're into that kind of thing. back to you, if you're lucky, there's wood underneath. no matter how it looks, it's pretty easy to make it look great. if not, you should check out (lumbr lquid8ters). you can get super high quality big sticks of prefinished oak for like $2-3/foot. when you go in, they'll try upselling you, but keep on the cheap and they'll show you their (imho) very excellent lower priced material.

linoleum only if it's period to the kitchen style; else new wood. you know tile's also cheap if you install it yourself. tile saw at harbr frate's cheap.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby Madman Munt on Fri Jun 16, 2017 7:07 pm

total_douche wrote:smelly carpets - laminate flooring


Would not buy this LP. Fuck no.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby total_douche on Sat Jun 17, 2017 8:53 pm

Tommy wrote:
total_douche wrote:I've had about as much of smelly carpets as I can take, so in the near-future I'm going to be nuking the carpets in my living room and hallway, and replacing them with something better (which is, presumably, anything but). Do any of you have experience with laminate flooring in humid climates? It's looking like the best compromise for me, but I'm worried about how well it'll handle Minnesota, since running the air conditioning all summer is out of the question (it costs way too much). Maybe I should just use linoleum...


Laminate flooring sucks. So much suck. Just a few years in and we've got a couple of gaps in every room from humidity shifts. This is on first and second floors. Spill water on it? Forget about it. The edges swell. Unless there is some super durable high-end shit, I wouldn't recommend it.

Maybe there's hardwood flooring under your carpet?

Hot dog, we have a wiener! I was curious and decided to explore in a spot where the cats tore up the carpet (another reason I want to get rid of it: they like to claw at the carpet outside a door when they want in and you want some god damned privacy while you're dropping anchor):

Image

So, next weekend, we'll pull the carpet and see how bad the existing floor is.

Plan A is to pretty up the existing flooring and call it a day.

Plan B is to install vinyl planks over it if the wood is too crap to repair within my (very small) budget. We will have to scrape that layer of granular crap off it. I'm glad I jacked some scrapers from work back when I was a miller. I'll get to relive the glory days of scraping crap out of sifters!

My big concern is that one of my cats likes to piss by my door whenever she's angry at me (usually because I wanted five minutes of time to myself). I have to plan for the cats pissing outside of their box when the fancy strikes them. The current routine of spotting with a UV light, then blasting the carpet with enzyme cleaners (which never really get the smell completely out) is driving me insane, but won't the wood absorb accidental/intentional discharge? I could apply a layer of polyurethane, but how well will that hold up? The vinyl option is very attractive to me.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby total_douche on Mon Jun 26, 2017 1:16 am

Well, we pulled the carpet, and found a beautiful hardwood floor... covered in overspray from who-knows-what. The first thought was that, since the majority of it in the living room seemed to come right off, that we could sand it off with a DA and leave the finish mostly unscathed, which we did, and it did. We did end up burning through in a couple of spots where it was thicker, though. I figured I could throw on a quick coat of varnish next week as a stop-gap until I have enough money to have the floor refinished professionally (i.e. when I get out of college). Well, then I got to the hallway. There's just no way I'm going to get through that crap without some serious burn-through. It's just so thick there. It's not like it was a painted floor or anything, either, there were places where cords and other things were obviously laying when they sprayed.

So I could use the vinyl planks on-hand to do the hallway, and leave the living room as-is (in beat-up but serviceable condition), but that will look awkward as all fuck. Option B is covering the whole floor with vinyl and leaving it until I can have it refinished.

I'll probably take option B.

Such a waste.
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Re: Home repair/maintenance/improvement thread

Postby Janeway on Tue Jun 27, 2017 8:49 am

^if you've still got that baby powder, you can use the leftovers as intruder protection by keeping it by the door for puffing them in the face or you can sprinkle it on the doorknob beforehand and get fingerprints all over the doorway, and when you're out of town you can sprinkle it on the inside floor so you can see if anybody was walking around your house while you were gone. i think they tried that last one on paranormal activity so, if it can catch a ghost... it'll be good enough for your cat burglars. and it's only $1.
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