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Postby Ruben23 on Wed Jun 27, 2007 2:34 am

I like to add some fresh fruits in my Thai curry. When the curry is very hot, it's really nice to crunch melon or banana.
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Postby caix on Wed Jun 27, 2007 7:36 am

I've been hooked on making this dish as of late:

Caix's Extra Virgin Sexy Short Pasta Dish

1 serving short pasta (bow-tie, rotini, rigatoni - whatever you like)
1 slice of onion, finely chopped
1 clove of garlic, chopped
1/2 cup grape tomatoes (i would really suggest either the mini-romas (grape tomato size) or the trader joe's cherry tomato mix (the one with green, orange, yellow and red)), sliced
extra virgin olive oil
fresh baby spinach
fresh basil
1/4 avocado, cubed
salt and pepper

Prep time: approx. 20 minutes

First, cook the pasta (easy!) to just before el dente, drain and return to the pot. While the pasta is cooking, gather a good amount of spinach (one-serving) in a mixing bowl (give yourself a good heap). Take a few basil leaves (however much you like basil), rip them apart and add to the spinach. In a separate, small pan, heat olive oil and flash the garlic in it. What you want to do hear is throw the garlic in (at a point where it will immediately sizzle) and turn the heat of. Let it sit for about 10-20 seconds, then pour on top of the pasta. Turn the heat on the pot full of pasta to low. Add the onions and let them heat up in the pan. Next, add the diced tomatoes and salt. The trick here is that you don't want to overcook anything, just really get it nice and warm. If the tomatoes get soupy, you cooked them for too long. Add the warmed pasta to the spinach and basil and toss until they are all warmed up. Pour onto a plate and top with the cubed avocado and fresh pepper.

The flavor of the tomatoes and salt will be subtle, yet incredibly flavorful. The salt will really pull the flavor out of them. If you did this right, the onions will be crunchy and sweet. The avocado will give a refreshing, cool flavor and creamy texture. The tomatoes will juice a little and mix with the olive oil to make a tasty sauce. The spinach will give a nice crunch. And the basil, of course, will give it that extra italian taste! The spinach and tomatoes will make this one colorful dish.

If you end up making this, please let me know. This is a very healthy and favorite dish of mine.
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Postby simmo on Wed Jun 27, 2007 7:45 am

Caix -

I make a meal very similar to this about once a week. I sometimes throw in some mozarella, toasted pine nuts... fresh basil is unfortunately hard to come by where I live. I find the addition of a splash of balsamic vinegar to the tomatoes is a nice touch....

Everyone else -

Thanks so much for your suggestions! Because I'm a contrary bastard, I'm not going to do any of them.... :oops: . Well, kinda gonna do Adam CR's... I'm gonna go for a Coconut Dhal and this simple Pea, Tomato and Paneer curry. I'll cook the rice up tomorrow!

I do like the sound of a lot of these recipes though... gonna give them a whirl some time soon I think! 'Tis a good resource, this thread.
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Postby Nico Adie on Wed Jun 27, 2007 7:52 am

Here's a quick and incredibly easy snack. I just had it for lunch, maybe you could too.

Aglio e Olio

Cook some pasta. Doesn't matter what type.

As it's cooking, finely chop as much garlic as you like. I like to use smoked garlic because it's not quite as strong, but the flavour is still rich. Fry this garlic in a large amount of olive oil. About 30 seconds before taking it off the heat, add some finely chopped chilli(or chilli flakes). Again, do this to your own preference.

Drain pasta and combine with the olive oil, garlic and chilli. Tear (or chop) some fresh basil and use this as a garnish. Maybe even grate some parmesan over the top.

Simple, filling and delicious.
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Postby caix on Wed Jun 27, 2007 7:54 am

simmo wrote:Caix -

I make a meal very similar to this about once a week. I sometimes throw in some mozarella, toasted pine nuts... fresh basil is unfortunately hard to come by where I live. I find the addition of a splash of balsamic vinegar to the tomatoes is a nice touch...


I used to have some vinegar in this dish, but it would actually ruin the delicate flavors, especially the tomatoes, which I think are the key flavor with the salt. I would suggest fresh mozzarella, warmed with the tomatoes, but I'm lactose intolerant so I don't get to eat that :( (one reason why I added avocado).

You should grow your own basil, it's very easy and cheap!
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Postby alex maiolo on Wed Jun 27, 2007 8:04 am

Nico Adie wrote:As it's cooking, finely chop as much garlic as you like. I like to use smoked garlic because it's not quite as strong, but the flavour is still rich. Fry this garlic in a large amount of olive oil. About 30 seconds before taking it off the heat, add some finely chopped chilli(or chilli flakes). Again, do this to your own preference.


I do a variation myself, but Simmo may have to think twice.

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Postby Dindon Shazwan on Wed Jun 27, 2007 8:44 am

I HATE GARLIC WHY ARE YOU ALL PUTTING GARLIC EVERYWHERE?

Still can't believe I'm the only one that doesn't like garlic on this forum.
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Postby simmo on Wed Jun 27, 2007 8:52 am

The garlic hater's life is a lonely one.

although you are apparently in the company of Shakespeare, Louis XV, Roman poet Horace, King Alfonso XI of Castile, and Thomas Nash. And Vampires.
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Postby Colonel Panic on Wed Jun 27, 2007 8:57 am

Garlic and onions would make a cat turd palatable.

That's just a speculation, BTW. I have no anecdotal evidence for that one.
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Postby Rimbaud III on Wed Jun 27, 2007 9:04 am

Dindon Shazwan wrote:I HATE GARLIC WHY ARE YOU ALL PUTTING GARLIC EVERYWHERE?

Still can't believe I'm the only one that doesn't like garlic on this forum.


You are patently nuts! A Frenchie with an intolerance for garlic!

Now I've heard it all.
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Postby caix on Wed Jun 27, 2007 10:24 am

I'm gonna bring out the big guns for this one.

Caix's 'Impress Your Friends' or 'Get Laid' Chicken and Pasta

Part 1: For Real Fresh Pasta Sauce

4-6 ripe roma tomatoes
1 large whole sweet vidalia onion
4-6 cloves of garlic
Fresh oregano
Fresh basil
Extra virgin olive oil
Tomato paste
Salt and pepper
Red Wine
Crushed red pepper (optional)

Serves 2-4 people

In a deep pan, heat on low. Quarter the onion and toss into a food processor (or blender, if you don't have one) with the oregano leaves. Spin until you have a chunky mash with an appealing scent. Remember to use more fresh herbs than you think (more than you would use dried herbs). Pour into the pan, cover and simmer until the mash is translucent and fills your kitchen with it's erotic scent of onions, olive oil and oregano. With the tomatoes, quarter each one and remove the seeds and watery bits. Toss into food processor with chopped garlic until you have a pink mash and smaller chunks of garlic. When the onions are done, toss in the tomatoes with salt, pepper and more olive oil (and red pepper if you're gonna use it) and add a 1/4-1/2 cup of red wine. Raise the heat to medium and let it simmer for about 10-15 minutes. At this point, it'll be a bit watery, so use the tomato paste at your discretion to
thicken it up. Turn the heat down and let it simmer for 20-30 minutes, with intervals of stirring so you don't burn the sauce at the bottom of the pan. When this is done, toss on top of pasta with freshly torn (or sliced) basil. You can add fresh mozzarella or parmasean or any cheese of your choice. But be mindful of the next piece to this deliciously ambitious meal...

Fetuccini or linguini works best (any pasta will do, but this is my fav for this).

Part 2: Cheesy Panko Fried Chicken Breast

Chicken breasts (1 per serving) (I suggest getting either organic or amish chicken breasts, they're far more succulent than your average grocier's)
Panko Bread Crubs (if you don't have these, you can either go all the way and make your own bread crumbs from dried italian bread or just get any high-quality bread crumbs from the store)
Flour
Eggs
Grated Asiago cheese (parmasean or ramano will also do, as long as it's fresh and grated, not the powdery Kraft stuff)
Olive Oil
Dried oregano
Dried basil
Dried parsley
Kosher Salt
Black pepper

This is actually very easy. First, all you have to know is the basics of frying chicken. these are the steps: flour > egg > breadcrumbs > fryer. And before I forget, turn the oven on 375 degrees. Also, if you have rather thick, large breasts *chuckle*, use the side of a meat tenderizer to pound them down a bit.

Start with beating an egg (or two, depending on how many breasts you are making - one egg will suffice for at least two large breasts) in a shallow, wide-rimmed bowl. Add flour to either another bowl or a large cutting board (wherever you can flour the chicken). In another similar bowl, add the following: Panko breadcrums, dried herbs (again, your discretion - more oregano and basil than parsely), kosher salt, black pepper and a good helping of the Asiago cheese.

In a frying pan, heat the olive oil on medium. When the olive oil permeates the kitchen air, it's time to start breading the chicken. Flour > Egg > Breadcrumbs > Pan and fry until golden brown on each side. Remove from oil and drain. Place onto a baking sheet (preferably slightly elevated) and bake for 20-25 minutes.

Serve with pasta and red wine. Enjoy!

Other options

1. You can cut the breasts into strips and do the same thing to make excellent chicken strips (and you can skip the baking part if you'd like).

2. With the pasta sauce above, another great thing to do is use it with gnocci and add mini-mozzarella balls for one excellently cheesy dish!

3. When serving the pasta in either case, try placing it on a bed of steamed spinach.

I've made this for friends and they absolutely love it. My girlfriend gets weak in the knees when I make this stuff.

If you haven't noticed, the italian in me can cook.
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Postby Jodi S. on Sun Jul 15, 2007 10:42 pm

I have recently been obsessed with the idea of duck confit.

It's too hot outside to cook some myself, but I was wondering if anyone around here had opinions on the canned kind you can buy at the gourmet places.

Duck rules. Preserved duck has to rule more.

Come wintertime, though, I will be making this. Trust me.
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Postby noise&light on Thu Jul 19, 2007 8:01 am

Courtesy of the NY Times:

101 Simple Meals Ready in 10 Minutes or Less


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/18/dining/18mini.html?em&ex=1184990400&en=3855522410e3df8f&ei=5087%0A

Some are, of course, obvious. But others, like the salami with eggs or couscous with sardines, would have never occurred to me.
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Postby Nico Adie on Thu Jul 19, 2007 6:18 pm

burun wrote:I have recently been obsessed with the idea of duck confit.

It's too hot outside to cook some myself, but I was wondering if anyone around here had opinions on the canned kind you can buy at the gourmet places.

Duck rules. Preserved duck has to rule more.

Come wintertime, though, I will be making this. Trust me.


I've had store-bought duck confit 4 times in about 6 months. Yet to be disappointed. They come in jars like the ones in the picture, as I'm sure you're aware, having seen them and all.

The jars are so handy for keeping all manner of things fresh in, and are a nice extra to top off this delicious type of food.

Image
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Postby madmanmunt on Fri Jul 20, 2007 1:20 am

I finally did those horsemeat burgers I was yammering on about a while back.

Half horse, half beef and a spoonful of duck fat to keep the horse moist.

They were some tasty burgers.
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Postby steve on Fri Jul 20, 2007 1:25 am

madmanmunt wrote:I finally did those horsemeat burgers I was yammering on about a while back.

Half horse, half beef and a spoonful of duck fat to keep the horse moist.

They were some tasty burgers.

That sounds incredible. Truly incredible. The only thing possibly better would be using maple-glazed bacon as the extra fat.

And that's just a "possible."
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Postby tommydski on Fri Jul 20, 2007 2:31 am

Dindon Shazwan wrote:I HATE GARLIC WHY ARE YOU ALL PUTTING GARLIC EVERYWHERE?

Still can't believe I'm the only one that doesn't like garlic on this forum.


I'm allergic to Garlic.

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Postby Colonel Panic on Fri Jul 20, 2007 9:00 am

steve wrote:
madmanmunt wrote:I finally did those horsemeat burgers I was yammering on about a while back.

Half horse, half beef and a spoonful of duck fat to keep the horse moist.

They were some tasty burgers.

That sounds incredible. Truly incredible. The only thing possibly better would be using maple-glazed bacon as the extra fat.

And that's just a "possible."

I have never tried horse meat.

I was led to believe that horse is an inferior animal for eating, and is only consumed in economically depressed parts of the world or under famine circumstances, like the retreat of Napoleon's Grand Armeé from Russia.

Somebody told me once that horse meat is gamy and tough and that it is not as nutritious as more popular large animal meats like pork, beef or lamb.

I've tried a few "unconventional" meats: venison, bison, rattlesnake, goat, ostrich, alligator and llama (I tried ostrich, alligator and llama for the first time at Grizzly's Lodge on Lincoln), but the idea of "eating a horse" always seemed kind of unappealing.

Come to think of it though, as bad as horse meat might possibly be, I imagine it's nowhere near as nasty as goat.

Is this just a cultural bias? Is horse meat actually good? Where can you get it in the US?
Last edited by Colonel Panic on Fri Jul 20, 2007 9:18 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby fiery jack on Fri Jul 20, 2007 9:04 am

Colonel Panic wrote:I imagine it's nowhere near as nasty as goat.
?? I'm with the muslims on this one

GOAT IS GREAT
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Postby Colonel Panic on Fri Jul 20, 2007 9:06 am

Yuck.

Maybe what I had was poorly prepared or a bad cut or something, but I didn't like it at all. It was oily and slightly fibrous in texture, kind of like a cross between lamb and a cheap cut of pork, but with a weird aftertaste.
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