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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby Madman Munt on Fri Jan 06, 2017 9:33 pm

Best thing to do with an aubergine (or fuggin' eggplant as it is to most of you):

Ingredients

4 long, thin-skinned purple aubergines (alternatively use the ordinary plump, pear-shaped variety available from most supermarkets)
1-2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
handful parsley leaves, finely chopped
5-6 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
a little sea salt and black pepper
150g/5oz feta cheese
lemons, for serving

Method

Preheat the grill to high.

Run a small, sharp knife round the top of the aubergine, 1cm/½in or so below the stalk and only just cutting through the skin; then make four evenly spaced, similarly shallow cuts, along the length of the aubergine right down to the end.

Grill the aubergines for about 20 minutes, turning every 5-7 minutes or so, until evenly cooked with charred skin, and until the aubergine feels soft, but not too collapsed within. In the case of the purple aubergines, the skin will also have turned a dull brown colour. Transfer to a large, oval, white plate and allow to cool for two minutes.

Peel away the aubergine skin in four long, narrow sheets using a small knife. Without cutting right through the stalk end, cut the aubergines in half lengthways and gently prise apart until you have two horizontal halves remaining attached at the top end

Mix the garlic and parsley with the olive oil until well combined and spoon the mixture over the aubergine. Season lightly with salt (not too much - the cheese is salty anyway) and pepper, and crumble the feta cheese over the top. If liked, trickle over more olive oil to finish.

Serve warm, or at room temperature with lemon squeezed over.


This is from The Good Cook by Simon Hopkinson (highly recommended, one of the best selections of simple, precise recipes I've come across).

Here he shows you how it's done:

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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby Nico Adie on Sat Jan 07, 2017 2:56 pm

Dauphinoise Potatoes

4 large potatoes, sliced approximately 5mm thick
3 cloves garlic, chopped finely
1/2 pint double cream
Salt and pepper

Layer the sliced potatoes in a baking dish, after each layer sprinkle some chopped garlic and add a little salt and pepper. Repeat until all your potatoes and garlic are in the dish. Pour the cream over it all. Stick it in the oven for about 45 minutes at 160-180c. It will be delicious.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby Madman Munt on Mon Jan 16, 2017 6:12 pm

Here's a simple simple way with duck legs that I got from a Gordon Ramsay book. It's really just a basic spice rub, but is very low effort and tastes good:

4 duck legs
1 tsp each of coriander, mace, and ginger (all ground)

Mix the spices together.

If they are wet, dry the legs with kitchen paper or cloth. Pierce the skin of the duck legs all over a with sharp implement*: the idea is that you go through the skin but not the meat, so the fat can come out as it renders.

Rub the spices all over the legs and leave in the fridge for 2 hours or so. I'd get 'em out a bit early to warm up to room temp before cooking.

Preheat oven to 180°C.

Roast starting skin side up for 45-50 mins (I'll normally leave them in longer), turning a couple of times. Be sure to drain the roasting tray of fat when it accumulates (you should get a fair bit) and save it in the fridge for future nefarious purposes.

You want the skin to be crisp but not burned and the meat to be very tender but not collapsing. Better to overcook this one than undercook. Leave to rest (10 minutes, say) in a warm place before serving.


*I have read that the very best thing to do this with is one of those cat brushes with hundreds of fine needle-like metal tines on a pillow-thingy (be sure to ask the cat's permission before using). I cannot vouch for this skin perforation method.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby Madman Munt on Sun Apr 09, 2017 5:08 pm

Fergus Henderson's Red Salad

Image

Maybe it's inappropriate to post it now with beetroot going out of season at the moment, but fuck it this is delicious.

Serves 6

2 raw beetroot, peeled and finely grated
¼ raw red cabbage with its core cut out, very finely sliced
1 small red onion, peeled, cut in half from top to bottom and finely sliced
6 healthy dollops of crème fraîche
2 healthy bunches of chervil, picked

For the Dressing

Healthy splashes of extra virgin olive oil
A little gesture of balsamic vinegar
A small handful of extra-fine capers
Sea salt and black pepper

Method
Mix everything together for the dressing. Toss all your raw red vegetables in the dressing, then on six plates place a bushel of this red mixture.Next to this, nustle your blob of crème fraîche as if the two ingredients were good friends, not on top of each other as if they were lovers. Finally a clump of the chervil rested next to the other ingredients in the friendly fashion. A very striking salad ready for the eater to mess up.


If you can't get chervil, you could try some parsley or tarragon or a mix of both.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby Madman Munt on Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:46 pm

Am I the only one still posting here or what?

Anyway, this is another Simple Simple one from Simon Hopkinson (his wonderful Vegetarian Option book):

Butter beans with sage, olive oil and dried chilli

If you prefer an even spicier flavour, you might like to use half olive oil and half chilli oil.

Serves 4, generously
300g dried butter beans
750ml water or stock
1 whole head of garlic, sliced in half across its middle
3-4 sage sprigs
3-4 small, dried red chillies
4-5 tbsp olive oil
salt

Put the beans into a large saucepan, cover with plenty of water (not the given amount) and bring to the boil. Turn off the heat, cover and leave for an hour. Drain and rinse under cold running water.

Preheat the oven to 160C/gas mark 3. Put the beans into a lidded, solid pot and cover with the 750ml of water or stock. Slowly bring to a simmer and skim off any scum that forms. Add all the other ingredients except the salt, and stir. Put on the lid and bake in the oven for about an hour, until the beans are tender. Only now should you add salt to taste.

Ladle into shallow soup plates and serve warm, rather than piping hot, perhaps with a sprinkling of fine vinegar.


Current bean science may dispute the soaking/salting advice but I'm not yet at the point of fiddling with a recipe that works so well. My only advice is to pay attention as the beans may be cooked to your liking sooner than 1 hour.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby Tommy Alpha on Mon Jul 17, 2017 5:44 am

Madman Munt wrote:Current bean science


Would see.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby jimmy two hands on Mon Jul 17, 2017 10:22 am

Pan fried fish.
1 lb fish fillets. best to use something with moderate to firm texture, like perch, catfish, bluegill, tilapia, walleye, what-have-you. Tastes good with stuff like cod, but that's got a delicate texture and can fall apart in the pan.
1/2 cup cornmeal
1/2 cup bread crumbs (can also use flour, crushed cornflakes, panko)
1 egg
salt & pepper
1 tbsp butter, 1tbsp oil

pat the fillets dry & salt each side
whisk egg in a small bowl
mix bread crumbs, cornmeal, & pepper on a plate. You can add other spices too. I'd recommend garlic powder, paprika, onion powder, midyett rub, and/or lemon pepper. Get creative & see what you like.
melt butter in a large frying pan, medium heat, & add oil. You can go all-butter or all-oil, I like to mix them up to get the butter flavor & the oil helps keep the butter from smoking.
dip one fillet in the whisked egg, let the excess drip off, press each side into the dry mix, shake off excess, place in pan. repeat with the rest of the fish.
cook each side 2-4 minutes. shorter time for thinner fish, longer time for thicker fish.
add lemon or malt vinegar or whatever if you like & eat up.

Note - you can do this in an oven at 375 F (190 C) on a baking sheet w/ cooking spray or oil or butter, 8-12 minutes depending on thickness of the fish. melt an extra tablespoon of butter and pour it on top of the filet before putting in the oven. This is better for delicate fish. Best method is deep frying, but it's not simple dealing with all the oil and everything.

Also note - get wild caught fish if you can. Tilapia sold in the states is usually farm-raised in a mud puddle in Vietnam or some shit but it's also usually cheapest - don't know if that's the case in the UK. If so, avoid it unless you're strapped for cash.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby Madman Munt on Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:47 pm

Here's another wot I dun recently! You'll want a healthy shoulder from a happy pig for this, so go to your preferred pig farmer to get the best quality meat.

Ultra-Crispy Slow-Roasted Pork Shoulder Recipe

1 whole bone-in, skin-on pork shoulder, 8 to 12 pounds total
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat oven to 250°F.

2. Line a rimmed baking sheet with heavy duty aluminum foil and set a wire rack inside it. Place a piece of parchment paper on top of the wire rack. Season pork on all sides liberally with salt and pepper and place on parchment paper. Transfer to oven and roast until knife or fork inserted into side shows very little resistance when twisted, about 8 hours total.

3. Remove pork from oven and tent with foil. Let rest at room temperature for at least 15 minutes and up to 2 hours. Increase oven to 500°F and allow to preheat. Return pork to the oven and roast until skin is blistered and puffed, rotating every 5 minutes, about 20 minutes total. Remove from oven, tent with foil and allow to rest an additional 15 minutes.


Full details here: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/12/ultra-crispy-slow-roasted-pork-shoulder-recipe.html
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby NewDarkAge on Wed Sep 20, 2017 4:45 pm

Hello everybody!

I have just found out that the building I'm going to be staying in at college this year is equipped with a student kitchen. This was unexpected! It means I will be able to try out some of the fantastic recipes posted in this thread. Che bello!
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby cerebralheadtrip on Wed Sep 20, 2017 8:40 pm

dosent get more simple than this. no need for hours of simmering and stirring, this is from cutting board to plate in under 15 minutes. fresh and rustic and the peak essence of summer eating.

start boiling some water in a pot.

meanwhile, you take yourself a big ripe heirloom tomato, ideally one you grew yourself or farmers market will do. some supermarkets now carry them as well from local farms. you have a narrow window to make this dish. now is the time. like this week. you will not get another chance until next summer.

you take this tomato and you roughly dice it. i keep the skin and seeds. you heat yourself some extra virgin olive oil in a pan, and add to that a couple cloves of thinly sliced garlic. some red pepper flakes too. do NOT let the garlic burn! just a little bit of heat to soften it up. watch it like a hawk. under a minute.

then you throw in that tomato. keep the heat nice and medium high. this is going to start to break down the tomato. this is a good thing. stir it every now and then.

your pasta water is boiling, toss a good portion of salt in. then follow it up with whatever you prefer, maybe some bowties, three, four nice big handfuls. start timing it.

keep an eye on your tomato sauce, you dont want all of the liquid to evaporate but you do want it to reduce a bit. season with a little salt, maybe throw in some fresh basil leaves as well. this whole thing is going to take 10 minutes max. conveniently, right about the same amount of time it will take your pasta to cook.

drain your pasta right before your box says its al dente. with barilla id recommend taking it a little before they say to. dececco is usually right on the money.

dump the pasta immediately into the pan with the tomato sauce. toss well. grate some fresh parmigiano-reggiano and dump a couple nice globules of ricotta on top as well.

eat like a damn hell ass king.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby cerebralheadtrip on Wed Sep 20, 2017 8:55 pm

heres another easy pasta dish.

boil your water and get your pasta started. this sauce is even quicker than the one above so a little head start dosent hurt.

slice up a clove or two of garlic, a fistful of parsley, grate yourself the zest of a lemon, and chop up some anchovies. maybe half a little tin.

heat extra virgin olive oil in a pan. same deal as before, dont let it burn, toss in some pepper flakes as well. add in your chopped anchovies too and briefly stir. now, quickly grab some pasta water from the other pot and dump it into your saucepan. its gonna start to simmer nicely. now throw in your lemon zest and the parsley. season with a little salt and pepper. squeeze some fresh lemon juice in there too. youve got yourself a sauce. keep an eye on it and let it reduce down a little, but keep some extra pasta water on hand in case you need it.

when the pasta is al dente, toss it with the sauce and add a little more reserved water as needed. dry is bad, you want lubrication. but not soupy. top with Parmesan.

eat like a damn hell ass king.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby first2letters on Fri Sep 22, 2017 5:03 pm

Here's a super-easy sauce recipe that's served me well with both pasta and Neapolitan pizza.

The only required measurement is a 28 oz. can of San Marzano tomatoes. (Don't skimp on the tomatoes -- or the EVOO, but that comes later.) Crushed works, or you can use an immersion blender to crush 'em to your liking before adding the other ingredients. They should be smooth, not quite pureed. Making a vat of the stuff? Add more cans.

Open the can(s) into a saucepan, set heat to medium, reduce to a simmer before it starts to boil.

Add to simmering tomatoes:

Handful of garlic cloves, largely intact -- break 'em up just enough to release their flavor as the sauce cooks. Don't slice, press, or do anything else that'll keep you from easily removing them later.

Handful of fresh basil leaves, muddled a little to release their flavors.

A few generous drizzles of GOOD extra virgin olive oil.

Sea salt, to taste.

Stir and simmer for at least 20 minutes, more if you need it. Taste with a spoon until it's perfect. (You'll know.) Remove and discard basil and garlic. Toss with pasta or let cool before using on pizza. Mangia!
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby night_tools on Mon Oct 02, 2017 4:46 pm

jimmy two hands wrote:Also note - get wild caught fish if you can. Tilapia sold in the states is usually farm-raised in a mud puddle in Vietnam or some shit but it's also usually cheapest - don't know if that's the case in the UK. If so, avoid it unless you're strapped for cash.


We don't get a lot of Tilapia over here at all - haven't seen it for a couple of years.
I guess Hake and Halibut are my go-to white fishes.... not cheap but delicious.
Haddock is probably the cheapest option in most fishmongers.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby free meat on Wed Oct 04, 2017 3:48 am

Spinach and Egg curry

Really simple and tasty meal. This makes loads and it tastes even better the next day. Again, don't go dirt cheap on coconut milk as the dish suffers when you do. One thing I've learned over the years is that any leftover fresh herbs can be stored in a tupperware container in the freezer without losing much of their flavour. Can do this with ginger too. Just grate some whenever you need it.

3 tbsp oil
2 large onions, peeled, halved and finely sliced
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 cloves garlic, peeled and finely sliced
2-3 green chillies, sliced (remove the seeds and membrane if you don't like it too hot)
5cm piece fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped
1 tbsp korma or other curry powder
400g tin coconut milk
200ml vegetable stock
6 eggs
300g baby spinach
Juice of 1 small lemon
1 big handful fresh coriander, tough stalks removed, leaves chopped
Rice - I cheat and get some of the 2 minute microwavable stuff because I absolutely hate cooking rice

In a large saucepan, warm the oil over a medium heat and sweat the onions with a pinch of salt until they soften and turn golden – about 15 minutes. Add the garlic, chillies and ginger, and fry for a couple of minutes. Stir in the curry powder, cook for a minute, add the coconut milk and stock, season and leave to simmer for 15 minutes.

Put the eggs in a pan of warm water, bring to a simmer and cook for five minutes. Drain, put them in a bowl of cold water for a couple of minutes, then peel. Add the eggs and spinach to the curry – put on the lid for the first minute, to encourage the spinach to wilt – and simmer gently for five minutes. Stir in the lemon juice and half the chopped coriander, and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Heat for only as long as it takes to warm the eggs through. Top with the rest of the coriander, and serve with rice.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby jimmy two hands on Thu Oct 05, 2017 10:55 am

I have a very simple recipe that I'll break down into two parts for you - the first part being a very simple staple dish, and the second part being a super simple flourish that will take an additional ten minutes of cooking/prep time but puts it over the top - very good if you've got a hot date you want to impress or if youse just want to treat yourself.

Part 1 - pan fried pork loin chops

get yourself some boneless pork loin chops, between a half inch to an inch thick. 1 pound will do you fine. 1 tbsp oil or butter into a frying pan, and heat until shimmering/melted, make sure to cover the entire bottom of the pan. Medium high heat - if your stovetop dial goes to 10, turn it to 7.

While that's getting ready, salt and pepper your chops. You can add this while they're still on the styrofoam tray they were packaged in, or on a cutting board. You don't need a ton of salt or pepper, about a pinch to each side - but get both sides of the chops. That is the basic "floor" of spices you'll need, but it's best to add at least one more herb or spice. For pork, sage works well as does rosemary or thyme (or parsely if you want to get all Scarborough Fair up in this bish), especially for this recipe. I always like to add a little paprika and/or Midyett rub, but for this particular recipe you'll want to stick to one or more of those herbs listed above - you don't want to overdo it on the spicing. use a similar amount as the salt or pepper, just a pinch or more. For dried herbs, especially the rosemary and thyme, it helps to crumble up the herbs in your hand before adding so it gets evenly distributed.

Ok, now your chops are all spiced up and your pan is hot and buttered, lay your chops out into the pan - 1 lb of 1/2 inch thick chops should all fit into a large frying pan (if they don't all fit, start off with half and do the other half afterward). I like to put the side that's facing up on the cutting board face down in the pan - more on this later. Pork cooks quickly and a lean cut can dry out if you over-cook it, so you'll want to put on a timer. For a 1/2 inch thick chop, go with 2 minutes (an inch thick, go 3). While you're cooking, have a look at the top of your chops. when you originally added the spices to both sides, the side facing down on the cutting board may have left a little spice behind. If so, add just a touch more.

Ok, your timer's gone off, so flip each chop with a spatula, and make sure they're lain out evenly on the pan. 2 more minutes is what you need. You may only need 2 minutes for thicker chops - look at the sides of the chops to see whether they've changed color. If the sides have already changed color before you've flipped them, you may only need a minute and a half. If you're unsure, cut into the middle of one to see if there's any pink left. You'll get the hang of this after a few times. If they're cooked through or there's just a little pink left, take them out of the pan and put them on a plate. Since they're hot, they'll keep cooking for a bit and that extra pink will get cooked. a sheet of foil over the top will keep them warm if anything else is still cooking.

Note, you can do this with other thin, boneless cuts of lean meat, like veal, or chicken breasts or thighs. If using chicken, the cuts won't be uniform thickness, which can cause part of the meat to get overcooked while you're waiting for the inside to cook. You don't want this to happen with chicken, because rare or medium rare chicken is gross and also not very safe. to get them to uniform thickness, you can either cut the meat in half width-wise, or you can pound them flat with a kitchen mallet. This is a nice tool to have, it's got a spiky side for meat tenderizing and a flat side for flattening. Put the meat on your cutting board, cover with a sheet of clingwrap or wax paper, and smack the shit out of it until it's an inch or half inch thick all over. Other cuts of meat go well with other spices, I find that I prefer thyme over sage for chicken. It all depends on the meal you're making and also what you prefer. That ends the simple, main course basis of your meal. I'll add part 2 in another post.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby djimbe on Thu Oct 05, 2017 11:19 am

here's a super easy one that I'm posting because I'm having leftovers for lunch today. It's a sausage and greens thing, which is an awesome combo:

half a red cabbage
6 or 7 stalks of kale (I like Russian better than lacenato for this)
1 medium yellow onion
1 hard pear (like a d'anjou)
some fresh ginger
some fresh garlic
ground coriander
some balsamic vinegar
some olive oil
your favorite sausage. I used a Swiss style ring bologna but this is good with brats or knockwurst too

cut the onion such that you have some longer julienne bits rather than a dice
cut the cabbage the same way. Toss 'em both in a saute pan with a bit of olive oil and get 'em to browning

cut the pear in half, remove the core, then cut into 1/8" thick slices longway
get the skin off a hunk of ginger and chop it up fine. You want about a tablespoon of chopped ginger
chop up a couple cloves of garlic nice and fine
take all the leafy parts of the kale off the stalk by tearing them. put the stalks in the compost bin 'cause they suck

once the onion starts to brown and the cabbage starts to get limp, toss the ginger, garlic, kale, and pears in the sauce pan. Grind some whole coriander in there or toss in your preground coriander

turn down the heat on the pan and put a lid on it. Continue to stir this on lower heat until the kale starts to wilt, then splash it with Balsamic vinegar, toss it some more, then shut heat off and put the lid back on. The whole cooking process takes from 10 to 15 minutes.

Cook yer sausage however you like and serve it with the greens.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby jimmy two hands on Thu Oct 05, 2017 11:23 am

OK, now that you've seen part 1, here's the flourish.
Part 2 - pears with balsamic reduction

You'll need 1-2 pears, 1-2 onions (2 small or one large for each), butter or oil, and 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar.
pour your balsamic into a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Once boiling, turn down to a simmer and cook it until it's been reduced by half. Your whole kitchen will smell of vinegar since that's what's boiling off, so you may want to open a window or turn on the exhaust fan.

While this is happening, slice your pears & onions into very thin slices, at most say 5 mm, lengthwise top to bottom. Cut out the seeds & stems of the pears & toss those. Heat a frying pan to medium high & add a tablespoon of oil or butter just like for the pork chops (I prefer butter for this recipe) and add the sliced onions & pears. Cook these about 10 minutes, until softened & slightly browned.

Now check on your balsamic. It should be thickened by now, about the consistency of syrup. Good? Ok, now put your pork chops from step 1 on a plate and artfully arrange the onions & pears on top, then drizzle your balsamic reduction on top. Make a little zig-zag pattern if you want to get all fancy like those restaurants for rich assholes. If you're on a date, have some nice white wine, and your date will be like "damn, this dude can cook", and you'll probably get laid, too.

jimmy two hands wrote:I have a very simple recipe that I'll break down into two parts for you - the first part being a very simple staple dish, and the second part being a super simple flourish that will take an additional ten minutes of cooking/prep time but puts it over the top - very good if you've got a hot date you want to impress or if youse just want to treat yourself.

Part 1 - pan fried pork loin chops

get yourself some boneless pork loin chops, between a half inch to an inch thick. 1 pound will do you fine. 1 tbsp oil or butter into a frying pan, and heat until shimmering/melted, make sure to cover the entire bottom of the pan. Medium high heat - if your stovetop dial goes to 10, turn it to 7.

While that's getting ready, salt and pepper your chops. You can add this while they're still on the styrofoam tray they were packaged in, or on a cutting board. You don't need a ton of salt or pepper, about a pinch to each side - but get both sides of the chops. That is the basic "floor" of spices you'll need, but it's best to add at least one more herb or spice. For pork, sage works well as does rosemary or thyme (or parsely if you want to get all Scarborough Fair up in this bish), especially for this recipe. I always like to add a little paprika and/or Midyett rub, but for this particular recipe you'll want to stick to one or more of those herbs listed above - you don't want to overdo it on the spicing. use a similar amount as the salt or pepper, just a pinch or more. For dried herbs, especially the rosemary and thyme, it helps to crumble up the herbs in your hand before adding so it gets evenly distributed.

Ok, now your chops are all spiced up and your pan is hot and buttered, lay your chops out into the pan - 1 lb of 1/2 inch thick chops should all fit into a large frying pan (if they don't all fit, start off with half and do the other half afterward). I like to put the side that's facing up on the cutting board face down in the pan - more on this later. Pork cooks quickly and a lean cut can dry out if you over-cook it, so you'll want to put on a timer. For a 1/2 inch thick chop, go with 2 minutes (an inch thick, go 3). While you're cooking, have a look at the top of your chops. when you originally added the spices to both sides, the side facing down on the cutting board may have left a little spice behind. If so, add just a touch more.

Ok, your timer's gone off, so flip each chop with a spatula, and make sure they're lain out evenly on the pan. 2 more minutes is what you need. You may only need 2 minutes for thicker chops - look at the sides of the chops to see whether they've changed color. If the sides have already changed color before you've flipped them, you may only need a minute and a half. If you're unsure, cut into the middle of one to see if there's any pink left. You'll get the hang of this after a few times. If they're cooked through or there's just a little pink left, take them out of the pan and put them on a plate. Since they're hot, they'll keep cooking for a bit and that extra pink will get cooked. a sheet of foil over the top will keep them warm if anything else is still cooking.

Note, you can do this with other thin, boneless cuts of lean meat, like veal, or chicken breasts or thighs. If using chicken, the cuts won't be uniform thickness, which can cause part of the meat to get overcooked while you're waiting for the inside to cook. You don't want this to happen with chicken, because rare or medium rare chicken is gross and also not very safe. to get them to uniform thickness, you can either cut the meat in half width-wise, or you can pound them flat with a kitchen mallet. This is a nice tool to have, it's got a spiky side for meat tenderizing and a flat side for flattening. Put the meat on your cutting board, cover with a sheet of clingwrap or wax paper, and smack the shit out of it until it's an inch or half inch thick all over. Other cuts of meat go well with other spices, I find that I prefer thyme over sage for chicken. It all depends on the meal you're making and also what you prefer. That ends the simple, main course basis of your meal. I'll add part 2 in another post.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby geiginni on Thu Oct 26, 2017 9:05 pm

I think I've found the perfect recipe for a fairly quick red pasta sauce, and the secret is a good sofrito, which forms a rich complex base that gives plenty of flavor - even done as vegetarian or vegan.

For this you will need:
1 large onion, finely chopped
1 large shallot, diced
2-3 red/orange/yellow bell peppers, finely chopped
8 oz cremini or button mushrooms, diced
3-4 cloves garlic, minced

1/3 C tomato paste (about 2/3 of a small can)
2/3 to 3/4 C dry red wine (I use the $5 bottle of Nero D'avola or Montepulciano D'abruzzo from Trader Joe's)
2 C chicken broth (or vegetable broth if doing vegan/vegetarian)
(1) 28 oz can of san marzano tomatoes (normal plum tomatoes are too watery, not sweet enough, and then you play a game of reducing further, adding sugar, adding salt to compensate for acidity, and you're still dealing with lotsa seeds)

1/2 Tb fresh rosemary, minced
1-2 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp. smoked paprika
1 tsp. crushed red pepper

Olive oil

[Optional] cooked drained meat (I usually used 2 links of italian sausage, removed from casing and browned. I've also used chicken sausage)


Bring about 3-4 Tbs of olive oil to a shimmer over medium-high heat in a large 4-6 qt. dutch oven.

Add the onion and shallot and cook until softened, about 2 min, add a pinch of salt to sweat out
Add the peppers and mushrooms and continue to cook, stirring regularly and adjusting the heat to ensure that no liquid forms or pools in the dutch oven - this is IMPORTANT. You want everything to caramelize and brown slightly - NOT boil in its own liquid. This means keeping everything hot while stirring so it does not burn!

Continue to cook until the veggies start to soften and meld/mix into a caramelized paste of sorts, at this point, add the garlic and continue to cook, stirring. Overall, this will take 20-30 minutes.

After the garlic softens, you should be seeing a fond start to form on the bottom of the dutch oven (fond is a layer or specks of browned vegetable material stuck to the bottom - this is good!)

Add the tomato paste and keep stirring. The tomato paste should start to darken and thicken with the veggies and add to the fond on the bottom.

Once the paste is darkened and smells earthy, and some nice fond has settled, add the red wine and stir, scraping the fond from the bottom and mixing in with the rest. This a the sofrito; and once rich and complex, the hard part is over and you're ready to complete the sauce (the easy part).

Once the wine has broken up the fond and evaporated slightly, add the stock and the can of tomatoes. Break up the tomatoes into bits and heat just to a boil. Add the herbs and seasonings, including salt and pepper to taste. Add the meat (if using).

Reduce heat to a simmer and simmer another 20-30 minutes until thickened to stick to the back of a spoon. Add to cooked pasta and blend to coat. Serve.
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I'm a shitty cook myself

Postby prd on Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:42 am

Thus whatever I cook is simple simple.

You need potatoes and eggs. Skillet and oil (I prefer sunflower oil for frying). Salt and pepper.

1. Slice the potatoes into flat pieces, not thicker than a half an inch.

2. Heat some oil in the skillet.

3. Put the potato slices in the skillet. Cover the entire bottom. If you use round tips of the potatoes, put the round side down. They will let out some water and shrink, thus the bigger side will fit in nicely once once you flip all those slices. I use a regular fork instead of spatula to flip them.

4. Once the potatoes are done at the bottom, flip them. They're done once they're soft or slightly brownish. Now you're almost there. Break some eggs and throw them in across the potatoes. Throw in some salt and pepper too. Wait till the eggs are as done as you please. You may even use a cover to speed it up.

I fine-tune with mustard and Sriracha.

It's simple, easy and it tastes surprisingly good. Once you're advanced (hahahahaha), you can mix the potatoes with pieces of broccoli or slices of carrot.

TIP: If you have any boiled potato leftovers, this is a good way to recycle them. Don't fuck it up and enjoy.
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Re: Simple Simple Recipes for FM NewDarkAge to Learn Cooking

Postby dontfeartheringo on Tue Oct 31, 2017 9:21 am

This video is pretty good at laying down the foundations of all good things:

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